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Monthly Archives: February 2014

About Fred's Country program:

Le program Fred's Country: La musique Country de Tradition avec Frederic (Fred) Moreau. Le program Fred's Country est diffusé sur 65 fréquences FM, 54 radios ou webradios.

Radio Show Host: Fred Moreau

Program Fred's Country w09-2014 - 28 février 2014 à 15:00 - February 28th, 2014

 

 

Music Charts Magazine is proud to be friends with Mr. Moreau and glad to now be one of the many to host Program Fred's Country. ( French/English)

Radio Program "Fred's Country" - Now at Music Charts Magazine!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Bird - The Life And Music Of Charlie Parker

Date = 25 February 2014

 

Author = Chuck Haddix

 

Genre = Jazz

 

Title = Bird: The Life and Music of Charlie Parker

 

Publisher = University of Illinois Press

 

Review=

            Charlie Parker (1920-1955) is among the most documented jazz musicians.  During a relatively brief recording career (1940-1954), he participated in approximately 250 recording sessions, around 175 as leader. He has been written about extensively, including in books by people with first-hand knowledge of him (such as Ross Russell) and by major critics (such as Gary Giddins).  Several Parker discographies have been published.  Carl Woideck compiled a collection of writings about him; Ken Vail chronicled his life. Mark Miller detailed his time in Canada.  Even a book reproducing his memorabilia has been published.  The list goes on.  Chuck Haddix’s Bird is one of the most recent books to focus on Parker.

            Now, almost sixty years after Parker’s death, a writer needs to have significant new information about—or a fresh approach to--the musician before undertaking a book about him.  Because of the author’s research in census records, city directories, and other documents, Bird provides new information, especially about Parker’s early years.  All knowledge is good, but the facts Haddix discovered are mostly trivial.

            Here are some facts Haddix provides, all of which are new to me.  Commenting on the Hannibal Bridge, he notes that “in 1917, at the peak of rail traffic, 271 trains passed daily through Union Station, the massive stone Beaux Arts train station located on the southern edge of downtown” Kansas City, Missouri (7).  He records that “as a teenager” in Oklahoma, Parker’s mother “worked as a maid for a household of six headed by Mary H. Morris on Main Street in McAlester, the county seat” (7), and that Parker’s father, “born in 1886,” resided “in a rooming house at 311 West Sixth Street in the heart of a crowded slum on the northern rim of downtown Kansas City, Missouri” (7-8).  He observes that Parker played in the band at the 1935 high school graduation of Rebecca Ruffin, who married him the next year; the band performed Elgar’s “Pomp and Circumstance” and the first theme from Coleridge-Taylor’s “An Imaginary Belle” (17).  (Does Haddix mean “Scenes from an Imaginary Ballet”?)  He pinpoints the location of Musser’s Ozark Tavern, where, in 1936, Parker was en route to play when he was injured in an automobile accident that killed a companion:  “three miles south of Eldon, Missouri, at the junction of Highways 52 and 54” (24). Haddix provides numerous addresses, such as those for Kansas City Musicians’ Local 627 (18) and Lucille’s Paradise (28), the Kansas City club where Parker joined the band of Buster Smith.

            As the book progresses, the author presents less new information and increasingly treats familiar Parker material: humiliation by Jo Jones, discovering how to create music he had been hearing in his mind by playing “Cherokee” in a new way, various band affiliations, how he became known as Yardbird (later shortened to Bird), the Benzedrine episode with Rubberlegs Williams, the engagement at Billy Berg’s, confinement at Camarillo State Hospital, recording sessions, relationships with wives and Chan Richardson, death in Hotel Stanhope, and so forth.  Though he interviewed people who knew Parker, including Jay McShann, Haddix based his treatments of events mainly on secondary sources, such as Robert George Reisner’s Bird: The Legend of Charlie Parker (1962), which includes various people’s recollections of Parker, and Mark Miller’s Cool Blues (1989).

            When presenting information from secondary sources, Haddix sometimes seems credulous, as when recounting Parker’s conversation with Einstein (62-63), sleeping under the bandstand during a performance by the Earl Hines band (64), and sleeping all day in a telephone booth (71).  These things might have happened, though in each instance Haddix relies on a single source: first, Junior Williams; second, Billy Eckstine (when citing the source of Eckstine’s quotation, Haddix records the wrong page number at n. 12 on 171; Eckstine’s words are from Reisner’s Bird, 85, not 17); third, Art Blakey. Providing another source for each would have bolstered the author’s claims.

            Because the sub-title implies full treatment of Parker’s life and music, it misleads: Bird is primarily biographical. When discussing music, Haddix mostly treats externals, as the following illustrates.  For Savoy Records, Parker led his first commercial session on 26 November 1945.  Haddix notes that Parker composed tunes for it, addresses the confusion over which pianist (Argonne Thornton or Dizzy Gillespie) and trumpeter (Gillespie or Miles Davis) perform on which selections, states that Parker had horn problems, identifies the number of takes for each tune, believes that Parker undermined the session by approaching it haphazardly, and points out that reviewers praised Parker’s solos while “panning the overall result” (83). The author offers what passes for analysis when commenting on “Now’s the Time,” noting only that Gillespie’s altered chords caused Davis to play “out of key” (82), though he does not demonstrate cause and effect.  Haddix thinks that this recording highlights “Charlie’s Kansas City roots and deep feeling for the blues” (82), but without explaining how.

            Though I acknowledge the difficulty of conveying, in prose, the nature of music, Haddix’s characterization of Parker’s gives little if any sense of its gloriousness—and it is this quality that makes the saxophonist’s life worth documenting. Haddix does not even mention that Parker’s solo on “Ko Ko” (from the “Now’s the Time” session) is widely considered one of the most impressive and important solos in jazz history.  It is so highly regarded that it was in the first group of recordings selected for the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress (see item 36 at http://www.loc.gov/rr/record/nrpb/registry/nrpb-2002reg.html; accessed 24 February 2014). The Library of Congress justifies its inclusion by stating that it “signaled the birth of a new era in jazz—bebop.”  Though the accuracy of this claim can be debated, Haddix ignores the recording’s significance. To him, it is just another Parker recording.  He also fails to indicate that two of the tunes Parker wrote on the spur of the moment for this session—“Billie’s Bounce” and “Now’s the Time”--are so appealing that each has been recorded hundreds of times. They are part of the jazz repertoire, as anyone who has listened to much jazz can attest. (Ted Gioia identifies them as such in The Jazz Standards [2012].)  “Billie’s Bounce” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame (2002).  In other words, Haddix does not attempt to do justice to Parker’s music.

            This book needed copy editing.  For example, Haddix writes “fed up towing the Jim Crow line” (69; the correct word is “toeing”) and “he was getting ringing wet” (72; “wringing”).  Because he quotes the latter correctly from a published source, “[sic]” should have been inserted after “ringing” to indicate awareness—if there was awareness--of the error in the source material, an interview with trombonist Trummy Young.  Singer Ethel Waters is identified as Ethyl (77).  Haddix twice states that the Kansas City Call was an African American newspaper (17, 28) and four times notes that Emry Byrd was known as Moose the Mooche (86, 95, 146, 184).  The given name of John S. Wilson is misspelled (171, n. 29). No publication date is provided for Chan Parker’s My Life in E-Flat (172, n. 41). The index identifies the radio program Bands for Bonds as Bands for Bond and alphabetizes Ross Russell according to his given name.  Though relatively unimportant, these and other infelicities should not occur in a book published by a major university press.

            Well-written and generally accurate, Bird will benefit readers who desire an overview of the musician’s life and career. Those already familiar with Parker will learn from it primarily specifics about his early years, such as addresses of various places.  It is not the book to consult for significant new biographical information or for a discussion of or insight into his music.

 

Author = Benjamin Franklin V

Album

LW

TW

Artist

Title

(Label)

TW SPINS

LW SPINS

Weeks on Chart

Spin +/-

Stations

 

2

1

Casey Donahew Band

Small Town Love

(Almost Country)

1,299

1,250

14

+49

67

 

3

2

Curtis Grimes

The Cowboy Kind

(CG)

1,261

1,175

13

+86

67

 

5

3

Josh Ward

Hard Whiskey

(Buckshot Records)

1,171

1,038

10

+133

66

 

7

4

Aaron Watson

July in Cheyenne

(Thirty Tigers)

1,096

977

15

+119

64

 

1

5

Cody Johnson

Dance Her Home

(CJB)

1,061

1,274

9

-213

65

 

4

6

Granger Smith

Miles and Mud Tires

(GS)

1,006

1,115

18

-109

62

 

9

7

JB and the Moonshine Band w/Angaleena Presley

Black and White

(Light It Up Records)

923

878

11

+45

62

 

6

8

William Clark Green

Rose Queen

(Bill Grease Records)

920

1,032

15

-112

61

 

14

9

Kevin Fowler

Love Song

(Kevin Fowler Records)

907

745

6

+162

64

 

11

10

Zane Williams

Little Too Late

(ZW)

900

807

8

+93

59

 

8

11

Randy Rogers Band

Speak Of The Devil

(MCA Nashville)

853

974

20

-121

53

 

12

12

Brian Keane

Bar Lights

(BK)

812

794

10

+18

56

 

15

13

Phil Hamilton

Hold On Tight

(Winding Road)

798

737

12

+61

54

 

10

14

The Statesboro Revue

Huck Finn

(Vision Ent./Shalley Records)

794

810

19

-16

42

 

19

15

Cameran Nelson

35 Runs Both Ways

(CN)

787

627

5

+160

52

 

18

16

Mark McKinney

Lonely Bones

(Texas Evolution)

783

652

5

+131

60

 

13

17

Whiskey Myers

Home

(Wiggy Thump)

782

775

14

+7

58

 

16

18

Sam Riggs

Angola’s Lament

(SR)

767

731

11

+36

53

 

17

19

Deryl Dodd

Loveletters

(Smith Ent.)

700

702

20

-2

46

 

21

20

Reckless Kelly

Every Step of the Way

(No Big Deal)

622

535

4

+87

51

 

20

21

Uncle Lucius

Somewhere Else

(Entertainment One Music)

619

619

10

-----

46

 

23

22

Green River Ordinance

Flying

(GRO)

588

468

4

+120

51

 

22

23

Jason Eady

OK Whiskey

(JE)

540

506

7

+34

40

 

43

24

John Slaughter

Ghost Town

(JS)

492

321

2

+171

43

 

24

25

Rob Baird

Same Damn Thing

(Carnival Music)

486

467

9

+19

41

 

36

26

Brandon Rhyder

Leave

(Reserve Records)

479

380

5

+99

46

 

29

27

Michael Coleman w/Jody Booth

Radio Don’t Sound Like Me

(DMG/CaneyCreek)

475

425

6

+50

42

 

28

28

Kylie Rae Harris

Waited

(KRH)

459

431

7

+28

39

 

30

29

Ray Johnston Band

Crush

(RJB)

453

420

11

+33

40

 

26

30

Mike and the Moonpies

The Hard Way

(MATM)

453

444

8

+9

37

 

31

31

Clay Thrash

My Heart

(Grange Records)

445

407

7

+38

38

 

41

32

Clayton Gardner

Table for Two

(CG)

412

332

4

+80

43

 

27

33

Jason Cassidy

Southern Side

(JC)

407

437

15

-30

41

 

50

34

Dolly Shine

Should’ve Known

(DS)

392

279

2

+113

36

PHOTO COMING SOON

37

35

Rodney Parker & 50 Peso Reward

Things You Make Me Do

(Smith Ent.)

382

363

3

+19

30

 

25

36

John David Kent

Until We Turn Around

(Blackland/Roustabout)

372

459

25

-87

37

 

39

37

Charlie Robison

Brand New Me

(Thirty Tigers/Jetwell, Inc.)

366

348

17

+18

33

 

46

38

Mike McClure Band

Silver and Blue

(598 Recordings)

346

291

3

+55

34

 

35

39

Rosehill

The Bible and the Gun

(Cypress Records)

344

384

8

-40

31

 

34

40

Dirty River Boys

Desert Wind

(DRB)

338

389

9

-51

32

 

40

41

Jesse Raub, Jr.

Bad Intentions

(JRJ)

332

336

12

-4

35

 

42

42

Jarrod Birmingham

December Gone

(JB)

330

325

5

+5

33

 

44

43

The Rusty Brothers

Revival

(Vision Ent.)

324

299

3

+25

31

 

N

44

Aubrey Lynn England

Sad Little Girl

(ALE)

318

270

1

+48

27

 

N

45

Josh Grider

White Van

(AMP)

312

134

1

+178

24

 

N

46

Wade Bowen w/Brandy Clark

Love in the First Degree

(Lightning Rod Records)

304

199

1

+105

25

 

N

47

Matt Caldwell

Drink Another

(AMP)

299

209

1

+90

32

 

N

48

Tommy Joe Wilson

Cold Beer

(River Wild Records)

298

214

1

+84

29

 

48

49

Sean Franks & Chapter 11

Catch This Train

(WarRoom Records)

295

282

4

+13

27

 

49

50

Redneck Brown & the Freshwater Donkeys

When I Think About Texas

(RB&FD)

293

281

6

+12

24

Non Reports:

1st Week:  KKAJ, KTCS, KTTX,

2nd Week:  KYBI

 

Freezes:

KAGG, KFWR, KGFY, KMKS, KOKE, KRRG, KSCH/KSCN/KOYN, KSEL, KVOM, KXAX, WACO

 

On Hold:

KYKC

Copyright © 2013, the Texas Music Chart. Used with permission from Best In Texas Music Marketing LLC, Houston, TX

Lizzie Sider interviews with Music Charts Magazine's Big Al WeekleyMusic Charts Magazine® proudly presents an interview with "Lizzie Sider".

Florida native lends her voice and message to students across state during school assemblies

Boca Raton, FL (January 27, 2014) -- LIZZIE SIDER, 15-year old emerging Country artist, is continuing her tour of elementary and middle schools, by conducting her Bully Prevention Assembly at over 100 schools during January, February and March of 2014, throughout the entire State of Florida. The tour continues after a successful weekend in Nashville, where Sider performed the national anthem at the Nashville Predators game before taking the stage at the historic Bluebird Café. "Bullying doesn't just happen in October during Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, it happens all year," says Lizzie Sider. "As someone who understands what it is like to be bullied, I am on a mission to help anyone who doesn't think anyone will listen."

During the 30 to 40-minute assembly, Sider will encourage kids to help prevent bullying as she recounts her ownLizzie Sider interviews at MusicChartsMagazine.com - Check it out!  Anti-Bully message personal journey as a young student being teased and ridiculed in elementary school, what it felt like, and how she tried to deal with it. In addition, Lizzie discusses the importance of everyone standing up to stop bullying. She will also perform her original song "Butterfly," which Sider co-wrote about her experience and how she overcame the teasing. Her goal is to help kids as a positive role model, having risen above her own ridicule, to pursue a career in music.

As a spokesperson for PACER's National Bullying Prevention Center, which was launched by PACER in 2006, Sider has already visited over 80 schools in California before starting her school tour in Florida.

Sider appeared on The Queen Latifah Show, has been interviewed by Access Hollywood, Billboard, Hallmark's Home & Family show, TIME for Kids, Nashville's Crook & Chase, and was named by the Country Music Association as an "Artist to Watch in 2013." Lizzie, who splits her time between Boca Raton, FL and Nashville, TN, recently participated in her first CMA Music Fest week with her own booth and with a live performance at the famed country music venue, the Wildhorse Saloon. Both "Butterfly" and her follow-up single, "I Love You That Much," charted in the Top 40 on MusicRow. The video for "I Love You That Much" was directed by award-winning Steven Goldmann, whose past credits include Alan Jackson, Martina McBride and Shania Twain. Sider is currently working on her first full-length studio album for release in 2014.

Listen to this Music Charts Magazine® special interview with Lizzie Sider HERE:

 

 

For complete Assembly Tour details, please visit www.LizzieSider.com

 

Keep up with Lizzie Sider via her social sites:

Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/lizziesidermusic

Twitter - https://twitter.com/LizzieSider

YouTube - http://www.youtube.com/lizziesider

SoundCloud - https://soundcloud.com/lizziesider

Tumblr - http://lizziesider.tumblr.com

Instagram - http://instagram.com/lizziesider

iTunes - https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/lizzie-sider/id476033569

To learn more about PACER, please visit - http://www.pacer.org/bullying/.

 

Copyright © 2012 – 2014 Music Charts Magazine® - (www.MusicChartsMagazine.com) – All Rights Reserved. Contents of this site including text and media may not be reproduced without prior written consent. Audio and video elements of this site are property of their respective owners and are used with permission.

Art Pepper - Unreleased Art Vol VIII - Live At The Winery - September 6, 1976Date = 21 February 2014

Artist Name = Art Pepper

 
Genre = Jazz

Title = Unreleased Art, Vol. VIII: Live at the Winery, September 6, 1976

Record Company = Widow’s Taste

Review =

Johnny Hodges, Benny Carter, Charlie Parker, Ornette Coleman—these and perhaps one or two others rank as the major jazz alto saxophonists. If they receive the grade of A, Art Pepper probably deserves A-.  Inventive, impassioned, and technically adroit, he played in an appealing individual style. Over almost four decades (from 1943 until 1982, the year he died), he recorded mostly at a high level, though he was off the scene in the mid 1950s and for most of the first half of the 1960s while incarcerated for heroin addiction, twice in San Quentin.  He rehabbed at Synanon.

Though Pepper was not underrecorded, his widow, Laurie Pepper, has issued a series of his previously unreleased performances on Widow’s Taste, most recently Live at the Winery.  I cannot think of a Pepper album that better demonstrates his skills.  It has flagwavers and sensitive ballads, as well as a blues, all performed by a musician playing at his best, which is something of a miracle, given his troubles along the way. Recorded in 1976 in Saratoga, CA, these performances are emotional, even highly so on one selection.

On the middle-groove, gritty “Saratoga Blues,” Pepper demonstrates his facility with the twelve-bar format.  At the end, he is especially effective when hinting at Charlie Parker’s “Parker’s Mood” but not actually quoting from it.  Some people applaud the tendency of soloists (Dexter Gordon, for example, and Parker himself) to quote from other tunes; I find it lazy, an unsatisfactory substitute for invention: Can’t think of anything original?  Then quote from another tune.

There are three swingers.  “Caravan” and “What Laurie Likes” are intense.  Evidencing the influence of John Coltrane, Pepper plays a long introduction before getting to the melody of the former.  The group plays the latter, melodically similar to Bobbie Gentry’s “Ode to Billie Joe,” in a funk groove, with a bow to Roland Kirk toward the conclusion. Yet “Straight Life,” one of Pepper’s signature tunes and the title of his autobiography (written with Laurie Pepper), is the performance that will most attract listeners who like music performed way up-tempo.  This reworking of “After You’ve Gone” is played so fast that one marvels at bassist Jim Nichols’s ability to keep the beat and at Pepper’s to create.

Though not precisely a ballad, “Ophelia” is far more subdued than the swingers.  Pepper states that he wrote it in order to capture various aspects of women, including their madness and beauty (an obvious reference to Ophelia in Hamlet). I cannot determine the degree to which he succeeds.  It is, in any event, an attractive composition and performance.  “Here’s That Rainy Day” is not only a ballad, but it approaches Frank Sinatra’s 1959 version as the most poignant recording of this song. Pepper’s interpretation ranks, in my judgment, with Miles Davis’s “It Never Entered My Mind” (1956) as among most supernal modern jazz ballad performances.  Pepper was so moved by pianist Smith Dobson’s solo that he almost chokes up when talking about it after the music stops.  He goes so far as to say that Dobson’s solo could serve as a definition of jazz: “That’s what they’re talking about when they say ‘jazz.’”  While Dobson’s solo is beautiful, Pepper’s impassioned playing is even more impressive.  Some soloists, such as Lester Young, insist on knowing the lyrics to tunes they play so they can faithfully render the emotions the words express.  On “Here’s That Rainy Day,” Pepper conveys the sadness and introspection—even the agony--of someone suffering from lost love.  

Live at the Winery is spectacular in every way, so much so that it might be Pepper’s most rewarding album.

 
Author = Benjamin Franklin V

 

Copyright © 2012 – 2014 Music Charts Magazine® - (www.MusicChartsMagazine.com) – All Rights Reserved. Contents of this site including text and media may not be reproduced without prior written consent. Audio and video elements of this site are property of their respective owners and are used with permission.

About Fred's Country program:

Le program Fred's Country: La musique Country de Tradition avec Frederic (Fred) Moreau. Le program Fred's Country est diffusé sur 65 fréquences FM, 54 radios ou webradios.

Radio Show Host: Fred Moreau

Program Fred's Country w08-2014 - 21 février 2014 à 17:17 - February 21st, 2014

 

 

Music Charts Magazine is proud to be friends with Mr. Moreau and glad to now be one of the many to host Program Fred's Country. ( French/English)

Radio Program "Fred's Country" - Now at Music Charts Magazine!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Album

LW

TW

Artist

Title

(Label)

TW SPINS

LW SPINS

Weeks on Chart

Spin +/-

Stations

 

1

1

Cody Johnson

Dance Her Home

(CJB)

1,274

1,274

8

-----

70

 

2

2

Casey Donahew Band

Small Town Love

(Almost Country)

1,250

1,205

13

+45

68

 

5

3

Curtis Grimes

The Cowboy Kind

(CG)

1,175

1,089

12

+86

67

 

3

4

Granger Smith

Miles and Mud Tires

(GS)

1,115

1,190

17

-75

70

 

8

5

Josh Ward

Hard Whiskey

(Buckshot Records)

1,038

988

9

+50

63

 

6

6

William Clark Green

Rose Queen

(Bill Grease Records)

1,032

1,060

14

-28

62

 

7

7

Aaron Watson

July in Cheyenne

(Thirty Tigers)

977

990

14

-13

62

 

4

8

Randy Rogers Band

Speak Of The Devil

(MCA Nashville)

974

1,106

19

-132

58

 

9

9

JB and the Moonshine Band w/Angaleena Presley

Black and White

(Light It Up Records)

878

853

10

+25

61

 

10

10

The Statesboro Revue

Huck Finn

(Vision Ent./Shalley Records)

810

811

18

-1

47

 

11

11

Zane Williams

Little Too Late

(ZW)

807

777

7

+30

58

 

13

12

Brian Keane

Bar Lights

(BK)

794

750

9

+44

55

 

12

13

Whiskey Myers

Home

(Wiggy Thump)

775

769

13

+6

59

 

18

14

Kevin Fowler

Love Song

(Kevin Fowler Records)

745

637

5

+108

60

 

14

15

Phil Hamilton

Hold On Tight

(Winding Road)

737

750

11

-13

53

 

16

16

Sam Riggs

Angola’s Lament

(SR)

731

678

10

+53

53

 

15

17

Deryl Dodd

Loveletters

(Smith Ent.)

702

698

19

+4

47

 

20

18

Mark McKinney

Lonely Bones

(Texas Evolution)

652

613

4

+39

56

 

22

19

Cameran Nelson

35 Runs Both Ways

(CN)

627

582

4

+45

49

 

21

20

Uncle Lucius

Somewhere Else

(Entertainment One Music)

619

590

9

+29

45

 

27

21

Reckless Kelly

Every Step of the Way

(No Big Deal)

535

459

3

+76

48

 

24

22

Jason Eady

OK Whiskey

(JE)

506

508

6

-2

41

 

37

23

Green River Ordinance

Flying

(GRO)

468

367

3

+101

44

 

25

24

Rob Baird

Same Damn Thing

(Carnival Music)

467

500

8

-33

42

 

19

25

John David Kent

Until We Turn Around

(Blackland/Roustabout)

459

624

24

-165

41

 

28

26

Mike and the Moonpies

The Hard Way

(MATM)

444

445

7

-1

38

 

29

27

Jason Cassidy

Southern Side

(JC)

437

443

14

-6

43

 

30

28

Kylie Rae Harris

Waited

(KRH)

431

432

6

-1

38

 

36

29

Michael Coleman w/Jody Booth

Radio Don’t Sound Like Me

(DMG/CaneyCreek)

425

376

5

+49

38

 

32

30

Ray Johnston Band

Crush

(RJB)

420

426

10

-6

40

 

34

31

Clay Thrash

My Heart

(Grange Records)

407

384

6

+23

35

 

17

32

Josh Grider

Smallest Town on Earth

(AMP)

403

653

15

-250

37

 

23

33

Wade Bowen

Songs About Trucks

(AMP/Sea Gayle)

401

532

20

-131

34

 

31

34

Dirty River Boys

Desert Wind

(DRB)

389

429

8

-40

37

 

33

35

Rosehill

The Bible and the Gun

(Cypress Records)

384

401

7

-17

36

 

38

36

Brandon Rhyder

Leave

(Reserve Records)

380

364

4

+16

39

PHOTO COMING SOON

47

37

Rodney Parker & 50 Peso Reward

Things You Make Me Do

(Smith Ent.)

363

276

2

+87

29

 

26

38

Jason Boland & the Stragglers

Electric Bill

(Proud Souls Ent.)

361

491

18

-130

34

 

39

39

Charlie Robison

Brand New Me

(Thirty Tigers/Jetwell, Inc.)

348

355

16

-7

34

 

35

40

Jesse Raub, Jr.

Bad Intentions

(JRJ)

336

378

11

-42

36

 

43

41

Clayton Gardner

Table for Two

(CG)

332

294

3

+38

41

 

41

42

Jarrod Birmingham

December Gone

(JB)

325

330

4

-5

34

PHOTO COMING SOON

N

43

John Slaughter

Ghost Town

(Winding Road)

321

220

1

+101

31

 

44

44

The Rusty Brothers

Revival

(Vision Ent.)

299

293

2

+6

31

 

42

45

Lower 40

Call Me Crazy

(Land Run Records)

292

311

5

-19

29

 

49

46

Mike McClure Band

Silver and Blue

(598 Recordings)

291

265

2

+26

34

 

45

47

American Aquarium

I Hope He Breaks Your Heart

(Last Chance Records)

286

281

3

+5

35

 

48

48

Sean Franks & Chapter 11

Catch This Train

(WarRoom Records)

282

276

3

+6

26

 

46

49

Redneck Brown & the Freshwater Donkeys

When I Think About Texas

(RB&FD)

281

277

5

+4

23

PHOTO COMING SOON

N

50

Dolly Shine

Should’ve Known

(DS)

279

237

1

+42

29

Non Reports:

1st Week:  KOXE, KVOM, KYBI

2nd Week:  KSTV

 

Freezes:

KECO, KKCN, KOYN, KSCH, KSCN, KTKO, KUKA, KWEY

 

On Hold:

KYKC

Copyright © 2013, the Texas Music Chart. Used with permission from Best In Texas Music Marketing LLC, Houston, TX

Levi Lowrey - Music Charts Magazine® - Country Music Album ReviewAnyone who is a fan of the Zac Brown Band might be familiar with the name Levi Lowrey. Levi co-wrote the Zac Brown hit, “Colder Weather”. On Feb. 25, 2014, Levi will release his self-titled, sophomore album through Zac Brown’s Southern Ground Artists.

I first heard Levi when he opened for Zac Brown Band in Kingsport a few years ago. I enjoyed his performance. But somehow, he then fell off my radar, and I lost contact with this great artist. I am glad he is back on my playlist. While Levi may not be your typical country artist, he definitely gives us some of the best country music you will ever hear. His sound and writing have been described as ‘one of a kind,’ and you don’t have to listen long to know that is true.

As I listened to the new album, I found myself getting into the lyrics more than I usually do. The songs make you think, and you just know how much the words mean to the writer. When you get to the end of a song, you are probably going to want to start that same song again, to study it, and learn it, and really listen to it before moving on to the next one.

“December Thirty-One” is one of my favorite songs on this album. This song isn’t just about Dec. 31. It’s about Dec. 31, at 11:59 p.m. We’ve all been there. One year is ending, a new year is about to begin. There’s a lot to look forward to, and there’s a lot to remember. When you couple memorable lyrics with a great melody, you have a hit record. I would love to hear this one on country radio. I have no idea what Levi’s plans are for putting a single out on country radio, but this is the one I would like him to consider.

There are 15 tracks on this album, with a total time of a little more than an hour. When you think you’ve heard the best one, you probably haven’t. Because when the next song begins, you will find out it is just as good as the one you just heard - and is some cases, even better.  Out of all the songs, the last one, “War Pigs,” is the only one I didn’t think fit with the rest of what Levi had to offer. It’s fast, it’s loud, it is a little weird. “War Pigs” is the only song I will probably not listen to over and over again. I know there are people who are going to love that song. But I believe, to thoroughly enjoy 14 out of 15 songs on a CD is quite an accomplishment for the artist.

 “When it comes down to the end, are you living, my friend – of just trying your best not to die?”. That is a question Levi asks in the third track, “Trying Not To Die”. Every song on this album gives you something to think about. And you are going to relate something you hear, to something you’ve done, or something that has happened sometime during your life.
The 15 songs you will get on Levi’s album are Picket Fences, December thirty-One, Trying Not to Die, High and Lonesome, That is All, Before the Hymnal Died, I’ve Held the Devil’s Hand, Urge For Leaving, Window Pane Soul, What She Don’t Know, Barely Getting By, Don’t Blame Me, Long Way Home, Flywheel and War Pigs.

All of the songs, except one, are original, and the CD features Levi working with a lot of guest musicians. Clay Cook, from Zac Brown Band; Ross Holmes, fiddler for Mumford and Sons/Cadillac Sky); and Oliver Wood from The Wood Brothers all help to make this album what it is. Ad Mac McAnally, performer, producer and Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame inductee to that list, and of course the fact that the album was produced by Zac Brown, and co-produced by Matt Mangano and Clay Cook, and there is no way this new project is going to be anything but great listening.

This is an album that belongs in the collection of every country music fan. It is one of the best albums I’ve heard in a long time. We’ve got an artist here who has produced 15 songs, and not one of them sounds like rock, pop or rap. 
You can keep up with all the news about Levi on his web site, www.levilowery.com, and follow him on Twitter @levilowrey. And remember, for all of your country music news and reviews, visit our site, www.countryschatter.com, and follow us on Twitter @countryschatter.

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