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Album

LW

TW
Artist Title (Label)
TW SPINS
LW SPINS
Weeks on Chart
Spin +/-
Stations
 
4
1
Roger Creager For You I Do (Roger Creager Music)
1,324
1,225
12
+99
70
 
1
2
William Clark Green She Likes The Beatles (Bill Grease Records)
1,300
1,387
12
-87
72
 
3
3
Granger Smith Silverado Bench Seat (GS)
1,289
1,292
12
-3
68
 
13
4
Turnpike Troubadours Before The Devil Knows We’re Dead (Bossier City)
1,121
868
6
+253
67
 
10
5
JB and the Moonshine Band The Only Drug (Average Joe’s)
1,104
1,005
12
+99
67
 
7
6
The Departed Prayer for the Lonely (Vision Ent./Underground Sound)
1,002
1,079
16
-77
57
 
2
7
Randy Rogers Band Fuzzy (Mercury)
958
1,334
14
-376
56
 
6
8
Jason Boland & the Stragglers Dark & Dirty Mile (Vision Ent./Proud Souls Ent.)
943
1,136
14
-193
60
 
11
9
Josh Grider Summer & Sixteen (AMP)
941
900
9
+41
65
 
8
10
Uncle Lucius Keep The Wolves Away (Entertainment One Music)
932
1,019
19
-87
55
 
9
11
Reckless Kelly She Likes Money, He Likes Love (No Big Deal)
887
1,013
20
-126
63
 
23
12
Josh Ward Promises (Buckshot Records)
773
651
4
+122
53
 
25
13
Aaron Watson Summertime Girl (Thirty Tigers)
766
621
6
+145
55
 
16
14
Mario Flores I Didn’t Pick This Life (MF)
765
778
15
-13
54
 
19
15
Zane Williams Overnight Success (ZW)
765
734
8
+31
51
 
5
16
Casey Donahew Band Whiskey Baby (Almost Country)
764
1,168
14
-404
53
 
14
17
Ray Johnston Band Bye Bye City Lights (RJB)
742
818
11
-76
54
 
26
18
Curtis Grimes Home to Me (CG)
741
608
9
+133
49
 
20
19
Josh Abbott Band She Will Be Free (Pretty Damn Tough Records)
723
688
5
+35
57
 
15
20
Eleven Hundred Springs Anybody Going to San Antone (EHS)
698
817
13
-119
52
 
12
21
The Damn Quails Me and the Whiskey (598 Recordings)
677
878
20
-201
50
 
21
22
Brian Keane Easy to Say Goodbye (BK)
670
678
16
-8
49
 
17
23
Cody Johnson I Don’t Care About You (CJB)
619
758
20
-139
48
 
18
24
The Statesboro Revue Fade My Shade of Black (Vision Ent./Shalley Records)
556
744
20
-188
43
 
35
25
Sam Riggs When The Lights Go Out (SR)
550
411
6
+139
42
 
28
26
Rosehill Did You Ever Turn Around (Cypress Records)
539
552
10
-13
42
 
29
27
Phil Hamilton Back of a ’73 (Winding Road)
514
525
6
-11
47
 
24
28
Hudson Moore Doin’ Just Fine (Vision Ent.)
476
626
17
-150
40
 
32
29
Jamie Richards Never Gonna Hear It (JR)
464
456
10
+8
44
 
30
30
Chris Knight Nothing On Me (Drifter’s Church Prod.)
464
502
15
-38
33
 
41
31
Thieving Birds In the Summer (TB)
440
388
3
+52
46
 
37
32
Green River Ordinance It Ain’t Love (Good Time Entertainment)
435
404
4
+31
39
 
43
33
Chapter 11 w/Aubrey Lynn England Whiskey and You (C11)
427
377
4
+50
31
 
31
34
Kyle Bennett Hard to Let You Go (KB)
423
460
13
-37
42
 
40
35
The Rusty Brothers Little Sister (TRB)
410
397
8
+13
33
 
33
36
Mike Ryan 57 Songs (MR)
400
436
6
-36
38
 
45
37
Cody Jinks Glad to Say (CJ)
386
358
9
+28
35
 
27
38
Deryl Dodd Somethin’ Ain’t Always Better Than Nothin’ (Smith Ent.)
383
582
17
-199
36
 
34
39
Jeremy Steding Lyin’ (JS)
377
433
11
-56
39
 
48
40
No Justice Songs On The Radio (Carved Records)
354
341
2
+13
40
 
50
41
Aaron Einhouse The Worst I Can Do (AE)
335
287
2
+48
33
 
N
42
Bri Bagwell Hound Dog (BB)
332
202
1
+130
31
 
44
43
Mark Allan Atwood Loser (MAA)
318
362
4
-44
28
 
46
44
Jesse Raub Jr Blame It On the Music (JR)
310
356
7
-46
25
 
N
45
Callahan Divide Party on the River (CD)
310
268
1
+42
22
 
39
46
Cyrus James Lickety Split (CJ)
306
401
10
-95
31
 
N
47
Clayton Gardner Something About You (CG)
305
235
1
+70
35
 
N
48
Kylie Rae Harris Slide Over (KRH)
297
234
1
+63
25
 
36
49
Tejas Brothers Don’t Be So Mean (TB)
270
409
11
-139
33
 
N
50
Dolly Shine Spinning My Wheels (DS)
260
251
1
+9
17

Copyright © 2013, the Texas Music Chart. Used with permission from Best In Texas Music Marketing LLC, Houston, TX

Country music mega-star Alan Jackson has been threatening to cut a bluegrass album for the past few years, dropping hints in interviews and tantalizing the substantial crossover between country and bluegrass fans.

When he brought Alison Krauss in to produce his 2006 project, Like Red On A Rose, there was speculation that the CD might take a grassy turn. But despite including a fine version of Wait A Minute, famously tagged by Seldom Scene, both that track and the whole album were firmly in the contemporary country camp.

This year, however, it finally came to pass. Jackson assembled an all-star cast of bluegrass pickers and singers in April, and tracked a new all-acoustic record at The Castle outside of Nashville.  In the studio were Sammy Shelor on banjo, Adam Steffey on mandolin, Tim Crouch on fiddle, Tim Dishman on bass, Rob Ickes on reso-guitar, and Scott Coney on guitar. Ronnie Bowman and Don Rigsby were on hand to provide harmony vocals, with Keith Stegall and Adam Wright producing.

Titled simply, The Bluegrass Album, it will be released September 24 on Jackson’s ACR label, distributed by EMI Records Nashville. Eight of the tracks are Jackson originals, along with covers of The Dillards’ There Is A Time, John Anderson’s Wild And Blue, and a slow, 3/4 time version of Blue Moon Of Kentucky.

We caught up yesterday with Sammy Shelor, who said that they tracked all the rhythms and most of the vocals in five sessions over two days.  The band sat in a circle with half dividers between them so that everyone could see each other, with Alan and the backup singers tracking live with the band.

“The most we did on any song was three takes; we got most of them the first time.  We worked from charts, but Alan knew what he wanted on every song before we started.”

Bluegrass fans may not recognize the name of session guitarist Scott Coney, who also plays guitar, fiddle and banjo in Jackson’s country band. Sammy says that he is also a super bluegrass guitarist, both lead and rhythm.

Studio band, producers and engineers with Alan Jackson in the studio for The Bluegrass Album sessions“Coney is the biggest Rice nut in the world.

He has hours of live Rice recordings, a lot of them with me playing on the show.  That’s how he found out about me.
Alan told Scott to put a band together for this record, but that he didn’t want it to ‘sound like all the other bluegrass albums country artists cut in this town.’

“There’s a good variety of styles and tempos among the songs.  Shelor said that there are some slower ballads, but also a number of “punchy, drivey, mid-tempo pieces,” and a couple of fast ones.

Sammy expects this record to be warmly embraced by bluegrass fans.

“Alan’s voice lends itself perfectly to bluegrass, in my opinion.  If you like Ronnie Bowman or Marty Raybon singing bluegrass, you’ll love Alan Jackson doing it.

I’m extremely blessed and happy to be a part of this project. It’s a great bluegrass record, and its Alan Jackson singing. What more could you ask?”

Current plans suggest that Jackson will do some television and selected live shows to promote The Bluegrass Album around the release date, with a likelihood of further touring to follow.  They hope to hit a number of major bluegrass festivals next year as well, using the same musicians who appear on the album.

We’ll report back as further details are announced.

John Lawless | July 12, 2013

Source:  http://www.alanjackson.com/news.html?n_id=4529

MusicChartsMagazine.com now is proudly flying the WSM Radio logo!
 
 
radio home of “The Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, TN

 

ABOUT WSM:

 

650 AM WSM is the most famed country music station in the world.  Each day, the station shares country, bluegrass, and Americana as well as the excitement of Music City with friends in Middle Tennessee and listeners around the world.

WSM debuted on Oct. 5, 1925, and less than two months later, the show would birth its most famous show (and the show that would make country music famous), the Grand Ole Opry.  The Opry was the first of WSM’s shows to develop such an excited audience that fans would visit live studio broadcasts.  That tradition continues today not only with the Opry, but with other signature programming including “An Intimate Evening with Eddie Stubbs”,Station Inn Sessions”, and more. In 1928, WSM was given the frequency of 650 kilohertz and admission to an elite group of maximum power, Class 1-A clear-channel broadcasters.  In 1932, the station’s new 50,000-watt transmitter made it a nation-spanning giant.  At the heart of this expansion was a diamond-shaped vertical antenna located just South of Nashville, the tallest tower in the nation at the time.  The station today still spans the nation with its AM signal, of course, while also circling the globe online.

WSM has gone on to become a broadcasting giant and a friend to hundreds of thousands of fans.  The station has won hundreds of broadcasting awards and was named Country Radio Station of the Century by “Radio & Records” in 2000.  WSM’s personalities are nationally recognized figures in country music, and its listeners range from U.S. Presidents to Country Music Hall of Famers, to artists climbing the charts toward their first number one hit.  You never know when a famous listener might drop in for a visit or to take the studio’s reigns for a while.

 

 

Please have a visit listen to WSM Radio here:  www.WSMonline.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Album

LW

TW

Artist Title (Label)

TW SPINS

LW SPINS

Weeks on Chart

Spin +/-

Stations

 

3

1

William Clark Green She Likes The Beatles (Bill Grease Records)

1,387

1,280

11

+107

71

 

1

2

Randy Rogers Band Fuzzy (Mercury)

1,334

1,451

13

-117

73

 

4

3

Granger Smith Silverado Bench Seat (GS)

1,292

1,197

11

+95

69

 

6

4

Roger Creager For You I Do (Roger Creager Music)

1,225

1,082

11

+143

69

 

2

5

Casey Donahew Band Whiskey Baby (Almost Country)

1,168

1,331

13

-163

69

 

5

6

Jason Boland & the Stragglers Dark & Dirty Mile (Vision Ent./Proud Souls Ent.)

1,136

1,195

13

-59

64

 

7

7

The Departed Prayer for the Lonely (Vision Ent./Underground Sound)

1,079

1,071

15

+8

63

 

9

8

Uncle Lucius Keep The Wolves Away (Entertainment One Music)

1,019

1,038

18

-19

56

 

10

9

Reckless Kelly She Likes Money, He Likes Love (No Big Deal)

1,013

959

19

+54

68

 

8

10

JB and the Moonshine Band The Only Drug (Average Joe’s)

1,005

1,063

11

-58

66

 

13

11

Josh Grider Summer & Sixteen (AMP)

900

811

8

+89

62

 

11

12

The Damn Quails Me and the Whiskey (598 Recordings)

878

827

19

+51

58

 

16

13

Turnpike Troubadours Before The Devil Knows We’re Dead (Bossier City)

868

773

5

+95

57

 

12

14

Ray Johnston Band Bye Bye City Lights (RJB)

818

823

10

-5

54

 

14

15

Eleven Hundred Springs Anybody Going to San Antone (EHS)

817

809

12

+8

55

 

17

16

Mario Flores I Didn’t Pick This Life (MF)

778

750

14

+28

51

 

15

17

Cody Johnson I Don’t Care About You (CJB)

758

798

19

-40

53

 

18

18

The Statesboro Revue Fade My Shade of Black (Vision Ent./Shalley Records)

744

729

19

+15

47

 

22

19

Zane Williams Overnight Success (ZW)

734

641

7

+93

45

 

25

20

Josh Abbott Band She Will Be Free (Pretty Damn Tough Records)

688

571

4

+117

56

 

20

21

Brian Keane Easy to Say Goodbye (BK)

678

686

15

-8

53

 

21

22

Chris Brazeal Band Middle American Blues (CBB)

653

662

13

-9

48

 

29

23

Josh Ward Promises (Buckshot Records)

651

519

3

+132

49

 

23

24

Hudson Moore Doin’ Just Fine (Vision Ent.)

626

629

16

-3

48

 

26

25

Aaron Watson Summertime Girl (Thirty Tigers)

621

569

5

+52

49

 

24

26

Curtis Grimes Home to Me (CG)

608

577

8

+31

48

 

19

27

Deryl Dodd Somethin’ Ain’t Always Better Than Nothin’ (Smith Ent.)

582

710

16

-128

45

 

28

28

Rosehill Did You Ever Turn Around (Cypress Records)

552

527

9

+25

42

 

33

29

Phil Hamilton Back of a ’73 (Winding Road)

525

464

5

+61

39

 

30

30

Chris Knight Nothing On Me (Drifter’s Church Prod.)

502

498

14

+4

38

 

32

31

Kyle Bennett Hard to Let You Go (KB)

460

469

12

-9

38

 

36

32

Jamie Richards Never Gonna Hear It (JR)

456

431

9

+25

46

34

33

Mike Ryan 57 Songs (MR)

436

453

5

-17

32

 

31

34

Jeremy Steding Lyin’ (JS)

433

477

10

-44

39

 

45

35

Sam Riggs When The Lights Go Out (SR)

411

350

5

+61

34

 

38

36

Tejas Brothers Don’t Be So Mean (TB)

409

407

10

+2

38

44

37

Green River Ordinance It Ain’t Love (Good Time Entertainment)

404

365

3

+39

37

 

27

38

Jason Cassidy Blame It On Waylon (A-Blake)

404

564

21

-160

36

 

40

39

Cyrus James Lickety Split (CJ)

401

398

9

+3

36

 

41

40

The Rusty Brothers Little Sister (TRB)

397

396

7

+1

31

 

48

41

Thieving Birds In the Summer (TB)

388

341

2

+47

36

\

43

42

Steve Helms Band Hard Earned Money (SHB)

378

375

9

+3

24

 

37

43

Chapter 11 w/Aubrey Lynn England Whiskey and You (C11)

377

430

3

-53

28

 

42

44

Mark Allan Atwood Loser (MAA)

362

382

3

-20

29

49

45

Cody Jinks Glad to Say (CJ)

358

323

8

+35

34

 

46

46

Jesse Raub Jr Blame It On the Music (JR)

356

350

6

+6

26

 

47

47

Gary Kyle Texas Strong (Pearl Snap Records)

352

346

2

+6

24

 

N

48

No Justice Songs On The Radio (Carved Records)

341

307

1

+34

39

 

39

49

Anson Carter All About the Music (AC)

289

403

18

-114

30

 

N

50

Aaron Einhouse The Worst I Can Do (AE)

287

285

1

+2

24

 Copyright © 2013, the Texas Music Chart.  Used with permission from Best In Texas Music Marketing LLC, Houston, TX

 

 

Vernon Dalhart

Vernon Dalhart ( Marion Try Slaughter ) lived April 6, 1883 to September 14, 1948.

Vernon Dalhart was a popular American singer and songwriter of the early decades of the 20th century. He is a major influence in the field of country music.

Dalhart was born in Jefferson, Texas. He took his stage name from two towns, Vernon and Dalhart in Texas, between which he punched cattle in the 1890s.

From 1916 until 1923, using numerous pseudonyms, he made over 400 recordings of light classical music and early dance band vocals for various record labels.

  Research by Billboard statistician Joel Whitburn determined “The Prisoner’s Song” to have been a No. 1 hit for 12 weeks in 1925-26. In 1998, “The Prisoner’s Song” was honored with a Grammy Hall of Fame Award and the Recording Industry Association of America named it one of the Songs of the Century. It was the

 

 

 

desire of the Victor Talking Machine Company to duplicate the sales success of ‘Wreck/Prisoner’ that led them to contract with Ralph S. Peer to go to the southern mountains in the Summer of 1927 to facilitate ‘The Bristol Sessions’, arguably the single-most important recording event in the history of country music, where Jimmie Rodgers and the original Carter Family were first discovered, and after which, Peer’s royalty model would become the standard of the entire recorded music industry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read more:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernon_Dalhart

James Meadows – Keepin’ It Real


Real country music in our own back yard
 

Great country music doesn’t only come out of Nashville. If you stop and look around, you just might find some of the best country music within an hour drive from home. Here in Northeast Tennessee, we didn’t have to go very far to find James Meadows. He recently released his second album, “Keepin’ It Real.” I first met James at the Washington County Fair, but never had the opportunity to see him perform until I caught one of his shows in Bristol, a few months ago.

The Abingdon, Va., resident is an ASCAP affiliated singer/songwriter and Nashville recording artist. While James was in college, he was involved with the ETSU Bluegrass, Old Time, and Country Music program. He played in many bands, featuring top notch talent from all over the world. He also played in many different band combinations, performing both bluegrass and country.

This very talented local artist brings great country music to Northeast Tennessee and Southwest Virginia with live shows just about every weekend. While his shows are often acoustic performances, he also works with his full band, The Country Mile Drifters. James is a fun performer. He has a lot of energy, and knows how to work with his audience, making it impossible for anyone not to have a good time.

His new CD, “Keepin’ It Real” is now available at amazon.comThe 11 songs on the new album paint a very good picture of who James is, and exactly what he does. Joining other very talented songwriters, James wrote or co-wrote several of the songs on the CD. In addition to the original music, listeners will also hear his version of the Randy Travis classic, “Forever and Ever Amen.”

His live shows offer a variety of music from many different genres. When you see James on on stage, you can expect to hear Classic Country, New Top 40 Country, a little Southern Rock and Bluegrass, and some of his original music as well. Oh his album, “Keepin’ It Real,” however, James does just that. He keeps his songs ‘real’ country. His voice is very versatile, and he uses his talent to create a unique sound on every song he sings. Many times when listening to a new song on the radio, you might find yourself trying to figure out exactly who the artist sounds like. There isn’t any comparison with James. James Meadows sounds like James Meadows. He is who he is, and there is no attempt at wanting to sound like anyone else. He doesn’t need to. After you hear him sing for the first time, you will remember where that voice is coming from when the next James Meadows song is played.

The songs you’ll get on this album are Like A Radio, Somebody Up There Likes Me, I Get to, Forever and Ever Amen, All I Ever Wanted, Knock Knock, They Walk On Your Heart, Keepin’ It Real, Feelin’ Good, Sad Songs Make Me Smile, and People Need People.

There is something for everyone on this CD. “All I Ever Wanted” is for the romantics; “They Walk on Your Heart” will touch every parent; “I Get To” will make each of us think about what is really important in our life; “People Need People” pretty much tells us what we already know, about getting through every day with someone close by to help us; and “Somebody Up There Likes Me” wins the prize for the ‘catchy melody, sing-along with this one’ song out of the 11 on the new CD.

The first single release from the new album, “Like A Radio,” made the Music Row Charts and charted in the Top 80 in February, with the help of the promotional team from ATP Records in Nashville. James is currently gearing up to release another single from this album and he is songwriting again in preparation for another album that will be in the works over the next few months.

James has shows scheduled for Davinci’s in Abingdon, Va.; Louie’s in Glade Spring, Va.; The Country Club and State Line Bar and Grill, both located in Bristol; and Sportsman Marina in Abingdon. You can find out more about James, check all of his show dates, and listen to his music at jamesmeadows.net.

Visit countryschatter.com to keep up with everything going on in the world of country music, visit our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/countryschatter, and follow us on Twitter @countryschatter.

 

Music Charts Magazine CD Reviews ( Country )

Link to Music Charts Magazine ®:

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