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Monthly Archives: November 2013

About Fred’s Country program:

Le program Fred’s Country: La musique Country de Tradition avec Frederic (Fred) Moreau. Le program Fred’s Country est diffusé sur 65 fréquences FM, 54 radios ou webradios.

Radio Show Host: Fred Moreau

Program Fred’s Country w48-13 – 29 novembre 2013 à 15:25

 

 

Music Charts Magazine is proud to be friends with Mr. Moreau and glad to now be one of the many to host Program Fred’s Country. ( French/English)

Radio Program “Fred’s Country” – Now at Music Charts Magazine!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Gretchen Wilson - Christmas In My Heart - Music Charts Magazine Country Music Album ReviewDepartment stores all over the country have already let us know it is not too early to start thinking about Christmas. For those of you who like listening to Christmas music sooner than the week of Christmas, the new holiday albums started coming out early in October. One of my favorite new albums comes to us from Gretchen Wilson, and is called “Christmas in My Heart”. While the album does contain the Christmas carol “Silent Night”, the other nine are Christmas songs, not traditional carols, and include the title track, “Christmas in My Heart,” “Santa, I’ve Been Naughty,” “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” “If You See Rudolph,” “Nuttin’ For Christmas,” “Have a Holly Jolly Christmas,” “Christmas Song,” “I Want a Hippopotamus for Christmas,” and “Blue Christmas”. Seriously, how can you not love an album with the ‘hippopotamus’ song on it!

This is the first Christmas album from Gretchen, who introduced the world to her “Redneck Woman” side in 2004. It took a song like “Redneck Woman” for the country music world to notice Gretchen. However, that song did nothing to show us how talented she really is. “Redneck Woman” was a catchy tune with lyrics that seemed to please not only the folks in the south, but everyone who listened to country music, no matter where they lived. Since that time, Gretchen has released four studio albums, one live album, and two compilation albums (Greatest Hits and Playlist: the Very Best of Gretchen Wilson). The 20 singles she has released over the years were slow, fast and mid-tempo, and gave fans an opportunity to listen to her vocals, and discover she was far more talented than her performance of ‘Redneck Woman” might have led them to believe.

On the new album, she turns the Elvis hit, “Blue Christmas,” into a very bluesy number, and probably the only song on the CD that comes close to what could be called country music. “Christmas in My Heart “is the sweet song you might expect it to be with a title like that. She sings “Silent Night” the way it was written, and once again gives us an opportunity to hear that her vocals are not only powerful, but beautiful.

When you listen to her rendition of “The Christmas Song,” it will be very easy to close your eyes and picture the fireplace, over-stuffed furniture, a crowded room, and a very large piano. She does this entire number accompanied only by a piano, and this arrangement includes a nice piano solo in the middle. Mixed in with the traditional holiday tunes, you will find three original songs, written for Gretchen for inclusion in her first Christmas album. Those songs are “If You See Rudolph” written by Trent Willmon, Jenee Fleenor and Rob Byus, “Christmas in My Heart,” written by Greg Barnhill, and “Santa I’ve Been Naughty,” written by Rob Simbeck and Frank Michels. Check out Gretchen’s facebook page, and follow her on Twitter @gw27.

Later!   Country

 

Music Charts Magazine Country Music Album Reviews by Country of www.CountrysChatter.com

Album

LW

TW

Artist

Title

(Label)

TW SPINS

LW SPINS

Weeks on Chart

Spin +/-

Stations

 

2

1

Kevin Fowler

How Country Are Ya?

(Kevin Fowler Records)

1,333

1,248

11

+85

70

 

1

2

Wade Bowen

Songs About Trucks

(AMP/Sea Gayle)

1,258

1,376

13

-118

69

 

3

3

Reckless Kelly

The Last Goodbye

(No Big Deal)

1,192

1,198

17

-6

65

 

5

4

Jason Boland & the Stragglers

Electric Bill

(Proud Souls Ent.)

1,146

1,108

11

+38

70

 

6

5

Randy Rogers Band

Speak Of The Devil

(MCA Nashville)

1,012

1,092

12

-80

68

 

11

6

John David Kent

Until We Turn Around

(Blackland/Roustabout)

946

955

17

-9

63

 

4

7

Kyle Park

Fit For The King

(Indie/Thirty Tigers)

945

1,131

18

-186

63

 

15

8

Aaron Watson

July in Cheyenne

(Thirty Tigers)

916

839

7

+77

62

 

13

9

Bart Crow

Loving You’s a Crime

(Smith Ent.)

914

931

18

-17

64

 

7

10

Bri Bagwell

Hound Dog

(BB)

912

1,020

20

-108

58

 

12

11

Turnpike Troubadours

If You’re Gonna Play in Texas

(Lightning Rod Records)

900

936

11

-36

58

 

14

12

Josh Grider

Smallest Town on Earth

(AMP)

892

873

8

+19

61

 

16

13

Granger Smith

Miles and Mud Tires

(GS)

884

805

10

+79

63

 

9

14

Mark McKinney

Stolen Cash

(Texas Evolution)

841

962

19

-121

56

 

18

15

Rich O’Toole

I Love You

(PTO Records)

814

800

18

+14

52

 

19

16

Mario Flores

Let Your Lonesome End With Me

(MF)

772

765

13

+7

48

 

8

17

Will Hoge

Strong

(WH)

767

991

17

-224

52

 

22

18

The Statesboro Revue

Huck Finn

(Vision Ent./Shalley Records)

735

679

11

+56

46

 

20

19

Casey Donahew Band

Small Town Love

(Almost Country)

728

689

6

+39

57

 

24

20

William Clark Green

Rose Queen

(Bill Grease Records)

714

634

7

+80

49

 

10

21

John Slaughter

Hasn’t Everyone

(Winding Road)

621

960

18

-339

48

 

21

22

Josh Abbott Band

She Will Be Free

(Pretty Damn Tough Records)

614

686

24

-72

46

 

23

23

Brandon Rhyder

Pray The Night

(Smith Ent.)

557

645

13

-88

48

 

28

24

Curtis Grimes

The Cowboy Kind

(CG)

555

503

5

+52

50

 

29

25

JB and the Moonshine Band w/Angaleena Presley

Black and White

(Average Joe’s)

550

496

3

+54

52

 

17

26

Green River Ordinance

It Ain’t Love

(GRO)

549

801

23

-252

44

 

30

27

Jake Kellen

Jesus and Hank

(Horny Toad Records)

520

496

9

+24

42

 

27

28

Rankin Twins

Jezebel

(RT)

504

513

14

-9

49

PHOTO

COMING SOON

36

29

Josh Ward

Hard Whiskey

(Buckshot Records)

489

402

2

+87

41

 

34

30

Jason Cassidy

Southern Side

(JC)

462

413

7

+49

45

 

31

31

Deryl Dodd

Loveletters

(Smith Ent.)

459

467

12

-8

40

 

N

32

Cody Johnson

Dance Her Home

(CJB)

446

237

1

+209

41

 

25

33

Six Market Blvd.

Mailbox

(Vision Ent.)

432

544

15

-112

39

 

33

34

Phil Hamilton

Hold On Tight

(Winding Road)

426

430

4

-4

41

 

26

35

TJ Broscoff

This is the Moment

(BGM Records)

418

531

16

-113

31

 

40

36

Jesse Raub, Jr.

Bad Intentions

(JRJ)

415

388

4

+27

40

 

39

37

Charlie Robison

Brand New Me

(Thirty Tigers/Jetwell, Inc.)

408

390

9

+18

39

 

42

38

Sam Riggs

Angola’s Lament

(SR)

401

363

3

+38

39

 

43

39

Uncle Lucius

Somewhere Else

(Entertainment One Music)

397

346

2

+51

40

 

38

40

Shane Smith & The Saints

Coast

(SSS)

393

391

14

+2

37

 

41

41

Kris Gordon

Triple on the Double

(Frio Records)

388

365

8

+23

37

 

37

42

Whiskey Myers

Home

(Wiggy Thump)

381

399

6

-18

41

 

50

43

Brian Keane

Bar Lights

(BK)

353

297

2

+56

38

PHOTO

COMING SOON

N

44

Dirty River Boys

Desert Wind

(DRB)

338

291

1

+47

35

 

48

45

Ray Johnston Band

Crush

(RJB)

333

312

3

+21

37

 

46

46

The Dusty Smirl Band

Mine For The Mile

(TDSB)

318

326

9

-8

36

 

45

47

Mark Allan Atwood

One Horse

(MAA)

312

334

12

-22

29

 

44

48

Cameran Nelson

Reckless in Texas

(CN)

304

334

9

-30

28

PHOTO

COMING SOON

N

49

Bo Phillips Band

Jonesin’ For George

(BPB)

282

278

1

+4

33

PHOTO

COMING SOON

N

50

Rob Baird

Same Damn Thing

(RB)

272

236

1

+36

30

Copyright © 2013, the Texas Music Chart. Used with permission from Best In Texas Music Marketing LLC, Houston, TX

Wail - The Life of Bud Powell (Author Peter Pullman) A Music Charts Magazine Book Review by Benjamin Franklin VDate = 24 Nov 2013    

Author’s Name = Peter Pullman

Genre = Jazz

Title = Wail: The Life of Bud Powell

Publisher = Peter Pullman

Review=

Because Peter Pullman began researching Bud Powell in the early 1990s, he probably knows more about the pianist than anybody, including Guthrie P. Ramsey, Jr., whose recent The Amazing Bud Powell uses Powell primarily as a springboard for musing about genius and the social identity of bebop.  Pullman’s knowledge is confirmed by his study of the pianist, an almost 500-page book published in 2012 at the author’s expense.  For it, Pullman conducted approximately 800 interviews, listened to all of Powell’s recordings, and consulted seemingly everything relating to his subject.  After assimilating this information, he wrote a balanced biography that details highlights as well as unpleasantnesses, of which there were many.  He treats his subject’s youth, professional associations, recordings, performances, involvement with women (mostly platonic), alcoholism, occasional heroin use, musical decline, revered status in France, and more.  Though Pullman is given to overstatement, a measured tone enhances his narrative, as may be observed when he details the two known times that Powell struck his mother (210, 223).  He does so dispassionately, refusing to milk the events for pathos, as some writers might have done.

A schooled pianist influenced by the likes of Bach, Ravel, and Art Tatum, Powell (1924-1966) joined the band of his brother William in 1940, played in his native Harlem at Minton’s Play House and Monroe’s Uptown House when bebop was being developed there, and joined the Sunset Royals before entering the big time with Cootie Williams in 1942.  Also with Williams irregularly during this period was Charlie Parker, whose new approach to music Powell embraced.  His life changed in 1945, when he was reportedly beaten by police after being arrested for drunkenness. The resulting headaches and strange behavior led to hospitalization and to a diagnosis of manic depressive psychosis.  Thus began serious emotional problems that lasted for the remainder of his life.

Yet off and on for approximately a decade beginning in 1947, Powell led impressive trio sessions for such labels as Roost, Clef/Norgran/Verve, Blue Note, Debut, and RCA.  His bassists included Ray Brown, Paul Chambers, George Duvivier, Percy Heath, and Curly Russell; Art Blakey, Kenny Clarke, Roy Haynes, Buddy Rich, and Max Roach were among his drummers.  An album of Powell’s solo performances was recorded in 1951. Powell’s reputation rests primarily on music from these sessions.  From the beginning of his career, however, leaders recognized the pianist’s ability, as the many impressive recordings on which he appeared as sideman illustrate.   These include Cootie Williams’s “Round Midnight” (1944), Dexter Gordon’s “Long Tall Dexter” (1945), Sarah Vaughan’s “If You Could See Me Now” (1946), J. J. Johnson’s “Jay Bird” (1946), Fats Navarro’s “Boppin’ a Riff” (1946), Charlie Parker’s “Donna Lee” (1947), Sonny Stitt’s “All God’s Chillun Got Rhythm” (1949), Quintet of the Year’s “Wee” (1953), Coleman Hawkins’s “All the Things You Are” (1960), Oscar Pettiford’s “Blues in the Closet” (1960), Charles Mingus’s “I’ll Remember April” (1960), Don Byas’s “I Remember Clifford” (1963), and Dizzy Gillespie’s “Groovin’ High” (1963).  Among the most significant musicians in jazz history, these leaders could have used any available pianist they desired, but they chose Powell.  Why?  Because of his inventiveness and his expressive, intense style, qualities that made him the preeminent bebop pianist and make his most accomplished music enduring.  Still, his recordings and live performances were hardly consistent, and his life was erratic.  In Wail, Pullman provides all the details of Powell’s life and career that most people would wish to know, but is most impressive and valuable when discussing the problems that led to the pianist’s decline--mainly his emotional problems, which led to hospitalizations.   Pullman had access to medical records, some willingly provided by institutions, but others relinquished only after he won the suit he filed against the New York State Office of Mental Health in the New York Supreme Court.  As a result, he bases his comments on the best possible evidence.   

                 That Powell was emotionally unstable is not news; fortunately, Pullman provides many details about this instability that were not previously known. From the medical records he learned, for example, about the pianist’s difficulty with what psychiatrists call ideas of reference (considering ordinary events as of great personal significance).  In 1947, drinking exacerbated this problem to the degree that in a club Powell fought a patron over the issue of race, an action that led to his confinement in the state hospital in Creedmoor, NY.  Because of his disruptive behavior while still there the next year, he was forced to wear a straightjacket; then, he underwent two series of electroconvulsive therapy (shock treatments).  On the topic of the pianist’s emotional state, Pullman notes that Powell was predisposed to a nervous breakdown; he also believes that Powell was disserved by judges who committed him to psychiatric hospitals and that the pianist received inadequate screening during the admission processes. I find his treatment of Powell’s emotional problems sound (I am neither a psychiatrist nor a mental health professional), though I wonder if some of his judgments of medical personnel are too harsh.

            Powell’s greatest recordings (including “All God’s Chillun Got Rhythm,” “Parisian Thoroughfare,” and “Un Poco Loco”) rank with the best work of any jazz pianist, which makes Powell’s artistic decline all the sadder.  Pullman notes that it began in 1953, the year Powell performed at Massey Hall in Toronto with his trio and with a quintet featuring Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie.  (Pullman believes that Powell’s solo on “Salt Peanuts” with the quintet “ranks with his greatest, regardless of context” [185]).  The author identifies strong and weak performances from then until the end of the pianist’s career.  At his last recording session, as leader in January 1966, Powell played so poorly that Pullman concludes that none of the music “should have been considered for release,” though the session was released, on Mainstream.  He further states that the music on this album constitutes Powell’s “last, embarrassing attempt . . . to make music” (376).  While I agree, to this statement I would add “sad” between the first two words. 

As an examination of Powell’s life—professional and personal--Wail will probably never be surpassed, which is not to say it is perfect.  (What is?)  Pullman makes claims he cannot support (“Powell gave his performances every drop of sweat that he had” [150]); treats George Shearing contemptuously (152, 183); states what people thought when he has no way of knowing (“Powell had to be thinking of the long, lonely voyage back to New York” [208]); criticizes Powell’s fan Evelyn Glidden gratuitously (237); dismisses people with a single unflattering  adjective (“the pedantic Kurt Mohr” [290], “the bourgeois Paudras” [337]); fails to define terms (October Revolution [358, 372]); and treats Leonard Feather’s Blindfold Test unfairly (382).  He also seems credulous, as when believing that Thelonious Monk cried because of his supposed pianistic inferiority to Powell (303) and that Powell recited the Gettysburg Address from memory when asked to do so (420). In all likelihood, a copy-editor would have challenged Pullman on some of these points and made stylistic suggestions, such as eliminating “, though,” in most instances.  Granted, Pullman published the book himself, so the cost of engaging a copy-editor for his long manuscript probably would have been prohibitive. Ultimately, these and other infelicities are relatively insignificant in the context of the book’s strengths, especially its comprehensiveness and detail.

Had Powell not been a gifted person, his life would hardly warrant comment.  Yet because he was an accomplished pianist, it assumes importance.  Thus, Pullman’s book is well worth reading by anyone interested in jazz, the creative process, or emotionally impaired artists.  Though one would gain a full sense of Powell from it, it might best be read in conjunction with listening to his recordings, most of which are readily available.  (A Powell discography would have enhanced the book.)  Doing so would permit one to hear his greatness (and not-so-greatness) and understand why Pullman evaluates the pianist’s artistry as he does. 

Author=Benjamin Franklin V

About Fred's Country program:

Le program Fred's Country: La musique Country de Tradition avec Frederic (Fred) Moreau. Le program Fred's Country est diffusé sur 65 fréquences FM, 54 radios ou webradios.

Radio Show Host: Fred Moreau

Program Fred's Country w47-13 - 22 novembre 2013 à 15:25

 

 

Music Charts Magazine is proud to be friends with Mr. Moreau and glad to now be one of the many to host Program Fred's Country. ( French/English)

Radio Program "Fred's Country" - Now at Music Charts Magazine!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Ronnie Dunn - Wish I Still Smoked Cigarettes - Artwork - by Little Will-E RecordsNew song available on iTunes today
 
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Nov. 19, 2013) – Country music fans have been clamoring for new tunes from legendary vocalist Ronnie Dunn, and the superstar artist is delivering with the release of “Wish I Still Smoked Cigarettes” on iTunes today, November 19, 2013.
 
Penned by Luke Laird, Lori McKenna and Barry Dean; the song has already resonated with listeners around the globe, receiving nearly 50,000 impressions since Dunn posted a streaming version of “Wish I Still Smoked Cigarettes” to his social media platforms last week.
 
Click here to download “Wish I Still Smoked Cigarettes” on iTunes.
 
“After receiving such an overwhelming response from followers last week, I’m thrilled to be offering this new song to fans,” said Dunn. “It’s just a taste of what’s to come as we continue working on a new album.”     
 
In addition to recording new music and developing his own Little Will-E Records label, Dunn is currently on the road performing select dates across the country. For more information, please visit www.ronniedunn.com.

George Strait Live - Photo credit - Jill Trunnell

Tickets to go on sale at 10:00 AM CST on Friday, December 6
 
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Nov. 19, 2013) – Reigning CMA Entertainer of the Year and “King of Country” George Strait will play his final concert June 7, 2014 at the 100,000-seat capacity AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. The show, which is the last date for Quicken Loans Presents George Strait’s The Cowboy Rides Away Tour 2014, will include an all-star lineup of guest artists (performing three songs each) including Jason Aldean, Kenny Chesney, Eric Church, Sheryl Crow, Ronnie Dunn, Vince Gill, Faith Hill, Alan Jackson, Miranda Lambert, Martina McBride and Lee Ann Womack.
 
Fittingly, the opening act for Strait’s final concert will be the “Kings of Texas Swing” and six-time Grammy Award-winning group, Asleep At The Wheel.
 
Tickets for the highly-anticipated concert will go on sale to the public Friday, December 6 at 10:00 AM CST and can be purchased via Strait's official website here.
 
Additionally, Strait's latest single "I Got A Car" is working its way onto country radio. It is the third release from his chart-topping 40th album Love Is Everything and was penned by Tony Douglas and Keith Gattis. To see more on the story behind the song, click here.
 
Although this is Strait’s final concert tour, the legendary artist will continue to record new music for longtime label home MCA Records and will perform select dates across the country after the tour has wrapped. For more information, please visit www.georgestrait.com.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - On Thursday, Nov. 14, Grammy award-winning artist Kelly Clarkson helped Musicians On Call (MOC) Nashville raise over $106,000, making it the highest-earning single event ever for the branch. In a rare, intimate setting for the superstar, Clarkson performed to a sold-out crowd at Hard Rock Cafe in downtown Nashville for the MOC Nashville sixth anniversary party presented by Citi. 

 
“When I first learned about MOC, it appealed to me for so many reasons," shares Clarkson. "I love how it creates opportunities for musicians to play for kids and bring music to the families who are spending their time, especially during holidays, in the hospitals away from the comfort of their homes.”
 
Clarkson lit up the room with her characteristic charm and to the delight of all concert-goers, she incorporated fan-favorites "Since U Been Gone," "My Life Would Suck Without You," "Stronger" and "Behind These Hazel Eyes" in the show, as well as new selections from her latest Christmas album, Wrapped In Red. Wrapped In Red features holiday classics "Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas," "Silent Night," "Baby It's Cold Outside," Clarkson's title track, "Wrapped In Red," plus more originals. Clarkson brought the holiday spirit alive with her Christmas tracks, and delivered a dynamic set true to her genuine and powerful vocal performance reputation. 
 
In addition to generously giving her time and talent, Clarkson donated her 2012 American Music Awards performance dress to Hard Rock Cafe for display in its world-famous memorabilia collection in exchange for a $9,000 contribution to MOC Nashville. 
 
"This is by far the biggest event to date for Musicians On Call Nashville," said Dana Sones, MOC Nashville's Program Director. "We are beyond grateful to Kelly Clarkson for donating her time and talent to help celebrate our sixth anniversary. This event not only celebrates how far we've come in six short years, but allows us to expand our programs to bring music to even more individuals in the years to come."
 
The event offered a VIP cocktail reception and open bidding on auction items throughout the night on autographed collectibles from Tim McGraw, Blake Shelton, Taylor Swift, Nashville Predators players, Tennessee Titans players and more, plus destination vacation packages and tickets to some of Nashville's most popular attractions. 
 
Since expanding into the Nashville community in April 2007, the local MOC branch has grown to support twelve weekly programs within seven area healthcare facilities and its volunteers have played for more than 70,000 patients, family and staff. All of the proceeds raised from the sixth anniversary party stay in Middle Tennessee and go directly to MOC Nashville and its continued mission to deliver live and recorded music to the bedsides of patients in healthcare facilities.
 
For more information about MOC, please visit www.MusiciansOnCall.org. ;
 
About Kelly Clarkson
Since bursting onto the music scene 10 years ago, Kelly Clarkson has released five studio albums (ThankfulBreakawayMy DecemberAll I Ever Wanted, Stronger), one Greatest Hits album, sold over 20 million albums worldwide, 10 million albums in the US and has had 10 singles in the top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 Singles Chart. She is the recipient of three GRAMMY Awards, four American Music Awards, three MTV Video Music Awards, two Academy of Country Music Awards, one country Music Association Award and 12 Billboard Music Awards. Clarkson’s last studio effort Stronger debuted at No. 2 on both the Billboard Top 200 and Digital Albums Chart. The album produced the smash singles, “Mr. Know It All” and “Stronger (What Doesn’t Kill You)” which marks Kelly’s 9th and 10th Top 10 hit. “Stronger (What Doesn’t Kill You)” was No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot 100 Chart for two consecutive weeks (three weeks total) marking her 3rd No. 1 on the Hot 100 chart.  Clarkson’s Stronger was certified Platinum by the R.I.A.A. and won the GRAMMY for Best Pop Vocal Album. Clarkson released Greatest Hits – Chapter last year, which featured three brand new tracks as well as a compilation of some of her greatest hits to date.  Kelly spent the summer touring with Maroon 5 and recording her very first Christmas album Wrapped In Red, which is set for release on October 29th.                                       
 
About Musicians On Call (MOC)
Musicians On Call (MOC) was founded in 1999 with the mission of bringing live and recorded music to the bedsides of patients in healthcare facilities. To date, its volunteers have played for over 400,000 people nationwide. Musicians On Call continues its mission through room-to-room hospital performances by both local musicians and national celebrities as well as the Music Pharmacy Program. www.musiciansoncall.org
 
About Citi Private Pass
The Citi Private Pass entertainment access program rewards Citi customers by offering access to thousands of events including preferred seating, early access, VIP experiences, complimentary tickets and more. The only way to get access is by purchasing tickets with a Citi credit card or Citibank debit card; customers can view a list of upcoming events and sign up for the Citi Private Pass newsletter at www.citiprivatepass.com
 
About Citi
Citi, the leading global bank, has approximately 200 million customer accounts and does business in more than 160 countries and jurisdictions. Citi provides consumers, corporations, governments and institutions with a broad range of financial products and services, including consumer banking and credit, corporate and investment banking, securities brokerage, transaction services, and wealth management.
 
About Hard Rock International
With a total of 171 venues in 54 countries, including 134 cafes, 18 hotels and 7 casinos, Hard Rock International (HRI) is one of the most globally recognized companies. Beginning with an Eric Clapton guitar, Hard Rock owns the world's greatest collection of music memorabilia, which is displayed at its locations around the globe. Hard Rock is also known for its collectible fashion and music-related merchandise, Hard Rock Live performance venues and an award-winning website. HRI owns the global trademark for all Hard Rock brands. The company owns, operates and franchises Cafes in iconic cities including London, New York, San Francisco, Sydney and Dubai. HRI also owns, licenses and/or manages hotel/casino properties worldwide. Destinations include the company’s two most successful Hotel and Casino properties in Tampa and Hollywood, Fl., both owned and operated by HRI parent company The Seminole Tribe of Florida., as well as other exciting locations including Bali, Biloxi, Chicago, Cancun, Las Vegas, Palm Springs, San Diego and Singapore. Upcoming new Hard Rock Cafe locations include Johannesburg, Chennai, Istanbul and Tenerife. New Hard Rock Hotel projects include Daytona Beach, Aruba, Riviera Maya, Abu Dhabi and Shenzhen and Haikou in China. New Hard Rock Casino projects in development include Hungary and Northfield, OH. For more information on Hard Rock International, visit www.hardrock.com.

Album

LW

TW

Artist

Title

(Label)

TW SPINS

LW SPINS

Weeks on Chart

Spin +/-

Stations

 

1

1

Wade Bowen

Songs About Trucks

(AMP/Sea Gayle)

1,376

1,370

12

+6

70

 

2

2

Kevin Fowler

How Country Are Ya?

(Kevin Fowler Records)

1,248

1,218

10

+30

75

 

4

3

Reckless Kelly

The Last Goodbye

(No Big Deal)

1,198

1,177

16

+21

73

 

3

4

Kyle Park

Fit For The King

(Indie/Thirty Tigers)

1,131

1,206

17

-75

73

 

5

5

Jason Boland & the Stragglers

Electric Bill

(Proud Souls Ent.)

1,108

1,137

10

-29

74

 

8

6

Randy Rogers Band

Speak Of The Devil

(MCA Nashville)

1,092

1,066

11

+26

72

 

9

7

Bri Bagwell

Hound Dog

(BB)

1,020

1,059

19

-39

62

 

6

8

Will Hoge

Strong

(WH)

991

1,130

16

-139

63

 

7

9

Mark McKinney

Stolen Cash

(Texas Evolution)

962

1,107

18

-145

66

 

11

10

John Slaughter

Hasn’t Everyone

(Winding Road)

960

978

17

-18

61

 

13

11

John David Kent

Until We Turn Around

(Blackland/Roustabout)

955

882

16

+73

62

 

12

12

Turnpike Troubadours

If You’re Gonna Play in Texas

(Lightning Rod Records)

936

918

10

+18

65

 

14

13

Bart Crow

Loving You’s a Crime

(Smith Ent.)

931

849

17

+82

66

 

15

14

Josh Grider

Smallest Town on Earth

(AMP)

873

827

7

+46

64

 

21

15

Aaron Watson

July in Cheyenne

(Thirty Tigers)

839

727

6

+112

64

 

19

16

Granger Smith

Miles and Mud Tires

(GS)

805

755

9

+50

66

 

10

17

Green River Ordinance

It Ain’t Love

(GRO)

801

1,024

22

-223

56

 

17

18

Rich O’Toole

I Love You

(PTO Records)

800

813

17

-13

57

 

18

19

Mario Flores

Let Your Lonesome End With Me

(MF)

765

759

12

+6

54

 

22

20

Casey Donahew Band

Small Town Love

(Almost Country)

689

667

5

+22

58

 

16

21

Josh Abbott Band

She Will Be Free

(Pretty Damn Tough Records)

686

826

23

-140

53

 

20

22

The Statesboro Revue

Huck Finn

(Vision Ent./Shalley Records)

679

736

10

-57

47

 

23

23

Brandon Rhyder

Pray The Night

(Smith Ent.)

645

640

12

+5

52

 

24

24

William Clark Green

Rose Queen

(Bill Grease Records)

634

625

6

+9

51

 

27

25

Six Market Blvd.

Mailbox

(Vision Ent.)

544

593

14

-49

46

 

26

26

TJ Broscoff

This is the Moment

(BGM Records)

531

608

15

-77

43

 

29

27

Rankin Twins

Jezebel

(RT)

513

495

13

+18

54

 

31

28

Curtis Grimes

The Cowboy Kind

(CG)

503

446

4

+57

51

 

39

29

JB and the Moonshine Band w/Angaleena Presley

Black and White

(Average Joe’s)

496

375

2

+121

55

 

28

30

Jake Kellen

Jesus and Hank

(Horny Toad Records)

496

524

8

-28

48

 

30

31

Deryl Dodd

Loveletters

(Smith Ent.)

467

464

11

+3

45

 

25

32

Cody Johnson

Ride With Me

(CJB)

445

613

16

-168

36

 

35

33

Phil Hamilton

Hold On Tight

(Winding Road)

430

408

3

+22

44

 

37

34

Jason Cassidy

Southern Side

(JC)

413

405

6

+8

48

 

34

35

Charlie Montague

Beautiful Noise

(CM)

402

425

14

-23

43

 

N

36

Josh Ward

Hard Whiskey

(Buckshot Records)

402

161

1

+241

32

 

36

37

Whiskey Myers

Home

(Wiggy Thump)

399

406

5

-7

45

 

32

38

Shane Smith & The Saints

Coast

(SSS)

391

437

13

-46

40

 

33

39

Charlie Robison

Brand New Me

(Thirty Tigers/Jetwell, Inc.)

390

428

8

-38

44

 

40

40

Jesse Raub, Jr.

Bad Intentions

(JRJ)

388

373

3

+15

43

 

38

41

Kris Gordon

Triple on the Double

(Frio Records)

365

382

7

-17

41

 

50

42

Sam Riggs

Angola’s Lament

(SR)

363

288

2

+75

36

 

N

43

Uncle Lucius

Somewhere Else

(Entertainment One Music)

346

278

1

+68

39

 

42

44

Cameran Nelson

Reckless in Texas

(CN)

334

365

8

-31

34

 

43

45

Mark Allan Atwood

One Horse

(MAA)

334

356

11

-22

34

 

45

46

The Dusty Smirl Band

Mine For The Mile

(TDSB)

326

329

8

-3

37

 

44

47

Chris Brazeal Band

Sounds Like Home

(CBB)

315

344

9

-29

32

 

47

48

Ray Johnston Band

Crush

(RJB)

312

315

2

-3

38

 

46

49

LiveWire

Whiskey Sunday

(Way Out West Records)

300

317

12

-17

28

 

N

50

Brian Keane

Bar Lights

(BK)

297

237

1

+60

36

Copyright © 2013, the Texas Music Chart. Used with permission from Best In Texas Music Marketing LLC, Houston, TX

Chris Lane Band - Let's Ride - Album ReviewIt's not often that I get to review an album and introduce you to a new artist in the same article. But, I have that opportunity with the Chris Lane Band. This group has been around for a little while, putting their first full-length album out in the spring of 2012. They haven't done much on radio, and most people still consider this a new group.
 
It is also not often that a new artist has a chance to bring his band to a venue where 65,000 people are in attendance to watch him open for a group like Florida Georgia Line. Chris Lane and his band got to do that on Thursday night, Aug. 22, at the Appalachian Fair in Gray, Tenn. Everyone knows Florida Georgia Line, everyone pretty much knew what to expect from them, and from their music. The surprise that night came from The Chris Lane Band. They not only opened the show for Florida Georgia Line, they did it effortlessly.
 
Chris Lane's voice was meant to do country music. And, he had a hand in writing eight of the songs on the band's debut full-length album. He is also a talented musician. All that, added to his very polished stage presence, and fan-friendly personality, puts Chris right where he needs to be to make it in the very crowded country music arena. And we have to mention, as one of his young fans was quick to point out to me, 'he's pretty easy on the eyes, too'.
 
The group has a second full-length CD in the works, but fortunately for country music fans, the first one is still available. The album is called "Let's Ride," and about 99.9 percent of this album is just what today's country music fans are looking for. The one-tenth of one percent that may not be is his rap version of the title track, "Let's Ride". He has that song on the album twice, once with the rap, once without. I obviously like the one without better. With the way rap music has been finding its way into mainstream country, I understand why Chris chose to do that to one of his songs. And, while there are fans out there who will like it, I probably never will.
 
I do need to tell you about everything else you are going to hear on this CD. Chris is giving us a nice mix of country, country/ pop, and country rock. His ballads are romantic,  his country is fun, upbeat, feel good, his country/pop is as unquestionably right up there with anything you get on today's radio (from artists like Lady Antebellum, Gloriana or Carrie Underwood). His song, "Alone," features Chelsea Sorrell, and when I first heard this song I wondered why it hasn't already found its way to country radio. If I were a program director at any top 40 country station, I wouldn't hesitate getting "Too Tennessee" on the playlist. And keep in mind, these are all songs from the first album, we have another one that will be released, hopefully, very soon.
 
A lot of the music we hear on country radio seems to be geared to younger listeners. Chris Lane hasn't forgotten the older country music fans. His music speaks to all of us. I don't think we will ever get country back the way it was from 1950-1980, but Chris Lane Band is doing their part to bring us back to a little of what we remember about country music. He's making it modern, while at the same time keeping it country.
 
The 14 tracks on the "Let's Ride" Deluxe Edition are "I Go Back," "All I Ever Needed," "Let's Ride," "Starting Tonight," "More Than That," "Harder Thank it Should Be," "Just Like You," "Carolina Kiss," "Alone" (featuring Chelsea Sorrell), "Too Tennessee, "Chasin' the Sun Down," "Let's Ride (rap version), "All I Ever Needed (acoustic) and "Georgia" (Bonus Track). This album is still available on iTunes, and you can listen to some of the songs on the Chris Lane Band web site.
 
Learn more about Chris and the band at www.chrislaneband.com. Visit his facebook page, and follow him on Twitter @chrislaneband. Be sure to go to www.countryschatter.com for more reviews of albums and shows, and for all the latest country music news. Follow us on Twitter, too, @countryschatter.
 
 
Music Charts Magazine Album Reviews - in partnership with CountrysChatter.com - Your #1 Country Music Source -

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