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Monthly Archives: January 2014

About Fred's Country program:

Le program Fred's Country: La musique Country de Tradition avec Frederic (Fred) Moreau. Le program Fred's Country est diffusé sur 65 fréquences FM, 54 radios ou webradios.

Radio Show Host: Fred Moreau

Program Fred's Country w05-2014 - 31 janvier 2014 à 15:25 - January 31st, 2014

 

 

Music Charts Magazine is proud to be friends with Mr. Moreau and glad to now be one of the many to host Program Fred's Country. ( French/English)

Radio Program "Fred's Country" - Now at Music Charts Magazine!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Album

LW

TW

Artist

Title

(Label)

TW SPINS

LW SPINS

Weeks on Chart

Spin +/-

Stations

 

5

1

Randy Rogers Band

Speak Of The Devil

(MCA Nashville)

1,149

801

16

+348

66

 

1

2

Granger Smith

Miles and Mud Tires

(GS)

1,098

887

14

+211

67

 

3

3

Cody Johnson

Dance Her Home

(CJB)

1,065

856

5

+209

67

 

7

4

William Clark Green

Rose Queen

(Bill Grease Records)

1,002

750

11

+252

63

 

6

5

Aaron Watson

July in Cheyenne

(Thirty Tigers)

995

761

11

+234

63

 

4

6

Josh Grider

Smallest Town on Earth

(AMP)

962

822

12

+140

63

 

9

7

Casey Donahew Band

Small Town Love

(Almost Country)

957

688

10

+269

64

 

2

8

Jason Boland & the Stragglers

Electric Bill

(Proud Souls Ent.)

869

879

15

-10

54

 

10

9

Josh Ward

Hard Whiskey

(Buckshot Records)

855

655

6

+200

59

 

12

10

Curtis Grimes

The Cowboy Kind

(CG)

802

617

9

+185

59

 

15

11

JB and the Moonshine Band w/Angaleena Presley

Black and White

(Average Joe’s)

731

558

7

+173

55

 

8

12

John David Kent

Until We Turn Around

(Blackland/Roustabout)

699

695

21

+4

52

 

11

13

Wade Bowen

Songs About Trucks

(AMP/Sea Gayle)

675

636

17

+39

49

 

17

14

The Statesboro Revue

Huck Finn

(Vision Ent./Shalley Records)

644

544

15

+100

41

 

14

15

Reckless Kelly

The Last Goodbye

(No Big Deal)

628

582

21

+46

45

 

18

16

Phil Hamilton

Hold On Tight

(Winding Road)

622

479

8

+143

51

 

21

17

Whiskey Myers

Home

(Wiggy Thump)

602

435

10

+167

53

 

25

18

Zane Williams

Little Too Late

(ZW)

587

398

4

+189

52

 

26

19

Sam Riggs

Angola’s Lament

(SR)

551

382

7

+169

49

 

23

20

Brian Keane

Bar Lights

(BK)

513

420

6

+93

50

 

22

21

Deryl Dodd

Loveletters

(Smith Ent.)

491

424

16

+67

41

 

19

22

Turnpike Troubadours

If You’re Gonna Play in Texas

(Lightning Rod Records)

476

455

15

+21

39

 

16

23

Bart Crow

Loving You’s a Crime

(Smith Ent.)

470

547

22

-77

46

 

35

24

Uncle Lucius

Somewhere Else

(Entertainment One Music)

470

302

6

+168

43

 

27

25

Jason Cassidy

Southern Side

(JC)

463

342

11

+121

46

 

13

26

Kevin Fowler

How Country Are Ya?

(Kevin Fowler Records)

446

585

15

-139

33

 

41

27

Kevin Fowler

Love Song

(Kevin Fowler Records)

441

276

2

+165

44

 

30

28

Rob Baird

Same Damn Thing

(RB)

437

310

5

+127

37

 

38

29

Dirty River Boys

Desert Wind

(DRB)

422

291

5

+131

39

 

29

30

Will Hoge

Strong

(WH)

418

322

21

+96

35

 

42

31

Jason Eady

OK Whiskey

(JE)

415

274

3

+141

38

 

43

32

Kylie Rae Harris

Waited

(KRH)

413

272

3

+141

36

 

31

33

Mike and the Moonpies

The Hard Way

(MATM)

408

307

4

+101

38

 

20

34

Mario Flores

Let Your Lonesome End With Me

(MF)

404

446

17

-42

38

 

28

35

Ray Johnston Band

Crush

(RJB)

384

326

7

+58

37

 

N

36

Mark McKinney

Lonely Bones

(Texas Evolution)

381

167

1

+214

37

 

34

37

Charlie Robison

Brand New Me

(Thirty Tigers/Jetwell, Inc.)

358

304

13

+54

35

 

39

38

Rosehill

The Bible and the Gun

(Cypress Records)

344

277

4

+67

32

 

37

39

Jesse Raub, Jr.

Bad Intentions

(JRJ)

341

298

8

+43

35

 

44

40

Clay Thrash

My Heart

(Grange Records)

329

271

3

+58

30

 

49

41

Michael Coleman w/Jody Booth

Radio Don’t Sound Like Me

(DMG/CaneyCreek)

318

235

2

+83

30

 

36

42

Rankin Twins

Jezebel

(RT)

304

298

18

+6

31

 

48

43

Kris Gordon

Triple on the Double

(Frio Records)

293

238

12

+55

32

 

N

44

Cameran Nelson

35 Runs Both Ways

(CN)

286

136

1

+150

34

 

45

45

Lower 40

Call Me Crazy

(Land Run Records)

285

256

2

+29

28

 

47

46

Redneck Brown & the Freshwater Donkeys

When I Think About Texas

(RB&FD)

269

248

2

+21

23

 

N

47

Jarrod Birmingham

December Gone

(JB)

262

180

1

+82

29

 

N

48

American Aquarium

I Hope He Breaks Your Heart

(AA)

240

205

1

+35

28

 

50

49

Bo Phillips Band

Jonesin’ For George

(BPB)

237

220

4

+17

26

 

N

50

Brandon Rhyder

Leave

(Smith Ent.)

235

162

1

+73

26

Non Reports:

1st Week:  KQTY, KYBI

2nd Week:  KBSO, KYKC

 

Freezes:

KAGG, KECO, KFLP, KMKS, KOKE, WACO

 

Holds:

KORA, KSTV

Copyright © 2013, the Texas Music Chart. Used with permission from Best In Texas Music Marketing LLC, Houston, TX

The Ali Ryerson Jazz Flute Big Band - Game Changer

 

Date = January 24th, 2014           

Artist Name = Ali Ryerson      

Genre = Jazz

Title = Game Changer

Record Company = Capri

Review =

For at least six decades, some jazz recordings have featured multiple instruments of the same family.  Beginning in the mid 1950s, for example, a vocal group released albums titled The Four Freshmen and Five Trombones, The Four Freshmen and Five Trumpets, The Four Freshmen and Five Saxes, and The Four Freshmen and Five Guitars.  In 1956, Columbia released J. J. Johnson and Kai Winding’s Jay & Kai +6, with eight trombonists.  The next year, Art Blakey recorded an album (Orgy in Rhythm) featuring nine percussionists. A few years later, Warner Brothers issued LPs by groups known as Guitars, Inc; Saxes, Inc.; and Trombones, Inc.  The first includes five guitarists; the second, thirteen saxophonists; the third, twenty trombonists, though only ten play at a time. Beginning in 1977, Odean Pope released several albums by his saxophone choir, usually consisting of nine saxophonists.  At a session presumably led by Jane Bunnett, the Havana Flute Summit recorded an album with four flautists (1996). This number of flutes is modest when compared with the nineteen on Ali Ryerson’s Game Changer (2012), possibly the most recent recording featuring many musicians playing the same kind of instrument, or variations of it. 

Ryerson had to confront the issue of how best to attain tonal diversity in music played by a band of flutes.  She did so by employing several types of the instrument: C, alto, bass, and contrabass.  One musician doubles on piccolo.  She engaged six arrangers who helped provide variety by writing engaging voicings and occasionally dividing the flutes into two sections, with one playing the melody while the other supports it, as frequently happens between reeds and brass in a typical big band.  Ryerson and the arrangers added texture by allotting solo space to members of the rhythm section--pianist Mark Levine, bassist Rufus Reid, and drummer Akira Tana. These tactics help—and the multitude of flautists adds body--but the overall sound remains, understandably, thin. It seems less so when the band backs a soloist, primarily because the large group is then of secondary interest. Sometimes, it rests during a solo.     

Despite this issue, Ryerson’s CD has much to recommend it, including the hip tunes it plays.  Aside from Gabriel Fauré’s Ali Ryerson - Game Changer Music Charts Magazine Album Review by Benjamin Franklin V“Pavane” (which has been recorded by Bill Evans and other improvisers), they are all by jazz musicians: Clifford Brown’s “Daahoud,” Wayne Shorter’s “Ana Maria,” Oliver Nelson’s “Stolen Moments,” Herbie Hancock’s “Speak Like a Child,” Dizzy Gillespie’s “Con Alma,” John Coltrane’s “Impressions,” Tom Harrell’s “Sail Away,” and Neal Hefti’s “Girl Talk” and “Lil’ Darlin’.”

While hip tunes appeal, what matters is how they are interpreted and performed.  Because the band plays what the arrangers wrote, they are the major interpreters, and their creations are uniformly attractive.  Ryerson employed six of them: Billy Kerr (who also performs on flute), Mark Levine, and Steve Rudolph, who were responsible for one tune each, plus Michael Abene (two tunes), Bill Cunliffe (two), and Mike Wofford (three). Consider “Ana Maria.”  On Shorter’s original recording, the soprano saxophonist is the only soloist, and mostly he plays the melody.  Wofford’s lush arrangement emphasizes the tune’s chords and inherent loveliness while allowing for solos by bassist Reid and, on alto flute, Marc Adler. Wofford’s interpretation is every bit as valid as the composer’s version and is, if anything, more pleasing, at least to me. Or consider “Con Alma,” for which Cunliffe provides a new introduction (new to me, anyway). About half-way into the piece, following Nestor Torres’s solo on C flute, the performance all but stops, then resumes with original Cunliffe material played in a more sprightly manner than the first part. Following a brief solo by drummer Tana, the music again halts before returning to Gillespie’s melody. That is, Cunliffe offers an idiosyncratic version of “Con Alma” that keeps the listener expecting the unexpected.  In other words, these and the other arrangements are inventive and well suited for the group that plays them. And the musicians perform the arrangements as directed: they never falter; they are professionals.  Plus, the three guest flute soloists—Holly Hofmann (C flute), Hubert Laws (alto), and Torres (C), each of whom solos once—are good improvisers. At least I assume they improvise, as opposed to playing written solos.

Because of Ryerson’s musical vision for this band of odd instrumentation, because of the excellent arrangements of attractive tunes, because of the musicians’ ability to perform well, and because of the nature of the solos, I recommend this CD.  Ultimately, the unavoidable thin sound—which is ameliorated somewhat by strategic planning--matters little. 

Author = Benjamin Franklin V

 

Music Charts Magazine ™ - Album & Artist Reviews

About Fred's Country program:

Le program Fred's Country: La musique Country de Tradition avec Frederic (Fred) Moreau. Le program Fred's Country est diffusé sur 65 fréquences FM, 54 radios ou webradios.

Radio Show Host: Fred Moreau

Program Fred's Country w04-2014 - 24 janvier 2014 à 15:00 - January 24th, 2014

 

 

Music Charts Magazine is proud to be friends with Mr. Moreau and glad to now be one of the many to host Program Fred's Country. ( French/English)

Radio Program "Fred's Country" - Now at Music Charts Magazine!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Album

LW

TW

Artist

Title

(Label)

TW SPINS

LW SPINS

Weeks on Chart

Spin +/-

Stations

 

 

1

Granger Smith

Miles and Mud Tires

(GS)

887

 

13

 

55

 

 

2

Jason Boland & the Stragglers

Electric Bill

(Proud Souls Ent.)

879

 

14

 

54

 

 

3

Cody Johnson

Dance Her Home

(CJB)

856

 

4

 

52

 

 

4

Josh Grider

Smallest Town on Earth

(AMP)

822

 

11

 

53

 

 

5

Randy Rogers Band

Speak Of The Devil

(MCA Nashville)

801

 

15

 

56

 

 

6

Aaron Watson

July in Cheyenne

(Thirty Tigers)

761

 

10

 

51

 

 

7

William Clark Green

Rose Queen

(Bill Grease Records)

750

 

10

 

46

 

 

8

John David Kent

Until We Turn Around

(Blackland/Roustabout)

695

 

20

 

45

 

 

9

Casey Donahew Band

Small Town Love

(Almost Country)

688

 

9

 

50

 

 

10

Josh Ward

Hard Whiskey

(Buckshot Records)

655

 

5

 

49

 

 

11

Wade Bowen

Songs About Trucks

(AMP/Sea Gayle)

636

 

16

 

42

 

 

12

Curtis Grimes

The Cowboy Kind

(CG)

617

 

8

 

47

 

 

13

Kevin Fowler

How Country Are Ya?

(Kevin Fowler Records)

585

 

14

 

36

 

 

14

Reckless Kelly

The Last Goodbye

(No Big Deal)

582

 

20

 

44

 

 

15

JB and the Moonshine Band w/Angaleena Presley

Black and White

(Average Joe’s)

558

 

6

 

45

 

 

16

Bart Crow

Loving You’s a Crime

(Smith Ent.)

547

 

21

 

47

 

 

17

The Statesboro Revue

Huck Finn

(Vision Ent./Shalley Records)

544

 

14

 

36

 

 

18

Phil Hamilton

Hold On Tight

(Winding Road)

479

 

7

 

38

 

 

19

Turnpike Troubadours

If You’re Gonna Play in Texas

(Lightning Rod Records)

455

 

14

 

41

 

 

20

Mario Flores

Let Your Lonesome End With Me

(MF)

446

 

16

 

39

 

 

21

Whiskey Myers

Home

(Wiggy Thump)

435

 

9

 

41

 

 

22

Deryl Dodd

Loveletters

(Smith Ent.)

424

 

15

 

38

 

 

23

Brian Keane

Bar Lights

(BK)

420

 

5

 

40

 

 

24

Rich O’Toole

I Love You

(PTO Records)

401

 

21

 

32

 

 

25

Zane Williams

Little Too Late

(ZW)

398

 

3

 

41

 

 

26

Sam Riggs

Angola’s Lament

(SR)

382

 

6

 

37

 

 

27

Jason Cassidy

Southern Side

(JC)

342

 

10

 

37

 

 

28

Ray Johnston Band

Crush

(RJB)

326

 

6

 

34

 

 

29

Will Hoge

Strong

(WH)

322

 

20

 

28

 

 

30

Rob Baird

Same Damn Thing

(RB)

310

 

4

 

34

 

 

31

Mike and the Moonpies

The Hard Way

(MATM)

307

 

3

 

31

 

 

32

Kyle Park

Fit For The King

(Indie/Thirty Tigers)

305

 

21

 

31

 

 

33

Mark McKinney

Stolen Cash

(Texas Evolution)

304

 

22

 

32

 

 

34

Charlie Robison

Brand New Me

(Thirty Tigers/Jetwell, Inc.)

304

 

12

 

28

 

 

35

Uncle Lucius

Somewhere Else

(Entertainment One Music)

302

 

5

 

33

 

 

36

Rankin Twins

Jezebel

(RT)

298

 

17

 

33

 

 

37

Jesse Raub, Jr.

Bad Intentions

(JRJ)

298

 

7

 

30

 

 

38

Dirty River Boys

Desert Wind

(DRB)

291

 

4

 

29

 

 

39

Rosehill

The Bible and the Gun

(Cypress Records)

277

 

3

 

29

 

 

40

Brandon Rhyder

Pray The Night

(Smith Ent.)

277

 

16

 

29

 

N

41

Kevin Fowler

Love Song

(Kevin Fowler Records)

276

 

1

 

29

 

 

42

Jason Eady

OK Whiskey

(JE)

274

 

2

 

27

 

 

43

Kylie Rae Harris

Waited

(KRH)

272

 

2

 

28

 

 

44

Clay Thrash

My Heart

(Grange Records)

271

 

2

 

28

 

N

45

Lower 40

Call Me Crazy

(Land Run Records)

256

 

1

 

26

 

 

46

Jake Kellen

Jesus and Hank

(Horny Toad Records)

250

 

12

 

27

 

N

47

Redneck Brown & the Freshwater Donkeys

When I Think About Texas

(RB&FD)

248

 

1

 

22

 

 

48

Kris Gordon

Triple on the Double

(Frio Records)

238

 

11

 

28

 

N

49

Michael Coleman w/Jody Booth

Radio Don’t Sound Like Me

(DMG/CaneyCreek)

235

 

1

 

22

 

R

50

Bo Phillips Band

Jonesin’ For George

(BPB)

220

 

3

 

26

Non Reports:

1st Week:  KBIM, KBSO, KBST, KFWR, KHPA, KKCN, KNUE, KOLI, KOXE, KSAM, KTCS, KXIT, KYKC, Radio Texas Live

 

On Holds:

KORA, KSTV

Copyright © 2013, the Texas Music Chart. Used with permission from Best In Texas Music Marketing LLC, Houston, TX

The Roys - Gypsy Runaway Train - A Music Charts Magazine NEW DISCOVERY for the month of January 2014Music Charts Magazine Presents - "NEW DISCOVERY" - "The Roys - Gypsy Runaway Train" - for the month of January 2014.

Looking for some "New" music to add to your player and can't find anything that blows you away?

Check out this Music Charts Magazine "NEW DISCOVERY" Interview with "The Roys" and be prepared to be excited knowing there is still 100% awesome music out there that you still have not heard.

After you listen to this great interview showing you the ins and outs of "The Roys and the song Gypsy Runaway Train" we are sure you will be glad you found this "New Discovery" to add to your music playlist.

The duo has shared the stage with superstars George Jones, Ricky Skaggs, Alan Jackson, Lady Antebellum, Doyle Lawson, Jason Aldean, Blake Shelton, Rhonda Vincent, Chris Young, Sara Evans, J.D. Crowe, The Oak Ridge Boys, Janie Fricke, Dailey & Vincent, Neal McCoy and Collin Raye.  They also performed with Jim Lauderdale at the sold-out "Playin' Possum! The Final NO Show" in Nashville on November 22, 2013.  Jim Lauderdale and The Roys mixed it up with “Why Baby Why” (1955), Jones’ first chart record.  This 2014 will likely prove to be even bigger and better for The Roys.

Radio interested in how to obtain this music please contact us on our contact page and we will be glad to get it to your radio station for radio play. Many thanks to those of you who have already played it.

For booking, interviews, or just to say Hi! Contact The Roys at:

 

Music Charts Magazine proudly presents "NEW DISCOVERY" for the month of January 2014 "The Roys - feature song Gypsy Runaway Train"

LISTEN to "NEW DISCOVERY" Interview with The Roys HERE:

Music Charts Magazine Presents "New Discovery" The Roys featuring the song "Gypsy Runaway" - Interview by Award winning DJ Big Al Weekley

 

 

Music Charts Magazine Presents NEW DISCOVERY "The Roys - Gypsy Runaway Train" - Interview by Big Al Weekley


Music Charts Magazine NEW DISCOVERY for the month of January 2014 - Gypsy Runaway Train - The Roys

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2012 - 2013 Music Charts Magazine, INC - All Rights Reserved. Contents of this site including text and media may not be reproduced without prior written consent. Audio and video elements of this site are property of their respective owners and are used with permission.


 

Ed Reed - Im A Shy Guy - A Tribute to the King Cole Trio and Their Music

 

Date = 18 January 2014

Artist Name = Ed Reed

Genre = Jazz

Title = I’m a Shy Guy

Record Company = Blue Shorts

Review =

Many jazz musicians have had odd careers. Active in the 1930s, alto saxophonist Boyce Brown left music to become a friar; as Brother Matthew, he recorded once, in 1956. Trumpeter Don Joseph recorded off and on during the 1950s, but only once subsequently, in 1984, presumably because of poor health.  Frustrated with his playing, Sonny Rollins took two sabbaticals, one in 1959 to practice for three years, and another in the early 1970s to study Eastern thought.  Craig Hundley (now Huxley) had an acting career before leading his first recording session at age fourteen; he became a classical pianist, composer, and film producer.  One of the strangest careers is that of singer Ed Reed.  Though born in 1929, he did not record until 2006.  This delay occurred partly because he was a junkie for forty years, beginning in the 1940s, and was incarcerated during the 1950s and 1960s; he sang in a prison band.  As best as I can tell, he was musically inactive during the 1970s and 1980s, possibly because of drug problems.  Clean since 1986, he resumed singing in the early 1990s.  Despite his age and the toll drugs doubtless took on him, his voice seems unaffected.  I would characterize it as robust and supple, free from the thinness and quavering that often affect an octogenarian. Someone listening to Reed without knowing his age might think him in his forties.

On his four CDs, Reed performs good tunes that typically have not been overworked.  Ed Reed Sings Love Songs (2006) features pieces associated with Duke Ellington (“A Flower Is a Lovesome Thing,” “Daydream”), Thelonious Monk (“Ask Me Now”), and Billie Holiday (“If the Moon Turns Green,” arranged by Carmen McRae).  It concludes with an a cappella version of “Motherless Child,” on which he stays in tune. The Song Is You (2007) is jazzier than the first CD because of the space allotted to the Peck Allmond Sextet, which backs the singer, as it does less prominently on Ed Reed Sings Love Songs.  Of the eleven selections on The Song Is You, four are by Ellington (“All Too Soon,” “Don’t You Know,” “I Didn’t Know about You,” and “It Shouldn’t Happen to a Dream”).  Yet the brief “I’m Through with Love” (2:22) is perhaps the most impressive track because Reed, backed only by guitarist Jamie Fox, sings it through but once, letting simplicity, vocal quality, and emotion make it moving and memorable; anything additional would be superfluous. He sings three songs recorded by Bill Henderson, who influenced Reed (“Don’t Like Goodbyes,” “It Never Entered My Mind,” and the title tune); he performs another one, “Never Kiss and Run,” on his next release, Born to Be Blue (2010).  On it, his song selection is typically attractive, though he sings one tune that is grittier than his usual fare, Big Joe Turner’s “Wee Baby Blues.”  These three CDs have been warmly received by the jazz press, as, probably, will be his most recent release, I’m a Shy Guy (2013). 

Despite critical acclaim, Reed seems little known outside the cognoscenti, possibly because he sings old songs (mostly standards) in an old style when listeners, especially young ones, favor the new:  he respects lyrics, enunciates clearly, and improvises by taking melodic liberties. These are, though, desirable, admirable qualities, ones well suited for the kinds of songs Reed prefers, including those on I’m a Shy Guy, on which he sings tunes recorded by Nat Cole’s trio in the 1940s, plus two pieces Cole recorded with the backing of large groups, “’Tis Autumn” (1949) and “Unforgettable” (1956).

Reed follows Cole’s example by taking most of the songs at a relaxed medium tempo.  Because of his playfulness and solos by saxophonist Anton Schwartz, pianist Randy Porter, and Fox, the bouncy “Straighten Up and Fly Right” is one of the least restrained performances.  “That Ain’t Right” is a blues.  The longest track, its amusing lyrics about a gold-digging woman might have inspired Ray Alfred’s lyrics for “I’ve Got News for You” about a two-timing woman. On “That’s the Beginning of the End,” Reed makes believable the advice of a former lover to a woman’s current one.  “This Will Make You Laugh” and “I’m Lost” feature Reed backed by a single instrumentalist—Fox on the first, bassist John Witala on the second.  Because of the intimacy of each, these two performances are highlights.

The rueful “Baby Baby All the Time” reminds listeners that Bobby Troup wrote a successful song other than “Route 66” (several of his compositions endure, including “You’re Looking at Me,” which Reed performs on Born to Be Blue). It is the sole tune Reed sings on I’m a Shy Guy that Diana Kral sings on her CD of Cole material, All for You (1995).  This release, her third, catapulted her to fame in her early thirties.  I hope that Reed’s CD of music associated with Cole serves him similarly in his mid eighties.

Author = Benjamin Franklin V

Music Charts Magazine History

- Song for the month of January 2014:

Lynyrd Skynyrd - "Free Bird"

Lynyrd Skynyrd - Free Bird

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ronnie Van Zant - Lynyrd Skynyrd"Free Bird" (often spelled "Freebird", including by the band itself on the cover of the single) is a song by the American rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd. It first featured on the band's debut album in 1973, and has been included on subsequent albums released by the band, including the previously unreleased, unfaded-ending version of the original recording (featured on Skynyrd's Innyrds). Amazon.com music reviewer Lorry Fleming calls it "the most-requested song in the history of rock music."

Released as a single in November 1974, "Free Bird" became the band's second Top 40 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in early 1975, where it peaked at No. 19. A live version of the song also reached the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1977, peaking at No. 38. Free Bird also achieved the No. 3 spot on Guitar World's 100 Greatest Guitar Solos.

It is used as a finale by Lynyrd Skynyrd during their live performances, and is their longest song, often going well over 14 minutes when played live.

According to guitarist Gary Rossington, for two years after Allen Collins wrote the initial chords, vocalist Ronnie Van Zant insisted that there were too many for him to create a melody in the belief that the melody needed to change alongside the chords. After Collins played the unused sequence at rehearsal one day, Van Zant asked him to repeat it, then wrote out the melody and lyrics in three or four minutes. The guitar solos that finish the song were added in originally to give Van Zant a chance to rest, as the band was playing several sets per night at clubs at the time. Soon afterward, the band learned piano-playing roadie Billy Powell had written an intro to the song; upon hearing it, they included it as the finishing touch and had him formally join as their keyboardist. The song was originally written in memory of Duane Allman.

Allen Collins's then-girlfriend, Kathy, whom he later married, asked him, "If I leave here tomorrow, would you still remember me?" Collins noted the question and it eventually became the opening line of "Free Bird".

Lynyrd Skynyrd in 1973

"Free Bird" is included in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll, and at number 193 in Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. In 2009 it was named the 26th best hard rock song of all time by VH1.

 

Read more at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_Bird

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Porter Wagner with Larry Sparks at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, TNMusic Charts Magazine® Celebrity Interview with Bluegrass' Larry Sparks

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