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Monthly Archives: November 2014

HOTDISC TOP 40
 
  30 November 2014

 

This is a list of the Top 40 Most Popular Songs released on the Rush Released promotional CD. Each week DJs and media people who receive Rush Released send back their reaction sheets where they are given the chance to rate every song. This chart is exclusively for clients of the Rush Released CD.  The chart is published weekly here, and also in Country Music People, Country Music & Dance, Up Country and Southern Country magazines.

To watch the video for each song (where available) click on the titles.

01

01

Drunk Americans
TOBY KEITH

02 02

That’ll Be The Day
MERLE HAGGARD

03 04

TRAVELLIN’ SOLDIER
MEGAN ADAMS

04 03

An Affair To Remember
RAY PRICE feat. MARTINA McBRIDE

05

06

New Country Singers
JAMES CAROTHERS

06 05

Enjoy The Ride
BRIAN COLLINS

07

07

Feels Like Coming Home
DAVID STARR  

08

09

Mosaic
BEAU + LUCI

09 10

He’s Messed Up!!!  
JO DEE MESSINA

10 11

Miranda In The Moonlight
GORDON JENSEN

 

 

 

 

11 08

Pride
IAN HIGHLAND feat. FRANK JENNINGS

12

13

Raise That Bar
TONY CLARKE

13

12

My Best Friend
MICHAEL LUSK

14

16

Like A Fading Rose
KARIN WRIGHT

15

17

Stay 
MADELINE SMITH 

16

18

Two Cats
OWEN MOORE

17

14

Good On You
NATIVE RUN 

18

19

Memphis Buzz
DAVID HILGENFELDT PROJECT 

19

15

Drinkin’ Beer
RAY SCOTT 

20

20

I’m Gonna Hire A Wino (To Decorate Our Home)
DAVID FRIZZELL

 

 

 

 

21

21

Gaia Blues
KENNY BUTTERILL feat. DONOVAN LEITCH 

22

24

Down To Ride
MIKE DONNELL BAND

23

22

One Night Between Friends
KATIE ARMIGER

24

23

Radio Song
MICHAEL SCOTT

25 26

Applications For An Angel
C W MONTGOMERY

26

28

Hometown Hottie  
LOCATION OF INCIDENT

27

29

Hit The Ground Runnin’
CRAB APPLE LANE

28

30

Unfaithfully  
A P MAURO 

29

31

Ralph The Sneaky Elf
DAVID WOOD

30 27

Highway Number Nine
DAVE SHERIFF  

 

 

 

 

31

32

With Your Hands
CAMERON-TROY

32 25

Fire
BEAU + LUCI

33

33

Fishin’ Pole Dancin’
BRUCE LARSON

34

34

Hop In My Truck
TIM CADIERE  

35

36

Southern Drawl
DAVID SHELBY

36

37

Party In The Barn
JAMES ROBERT WEBB

37

35

California Girls Have Gone Country
STEVIE LEE WOODS

38

38

Full Moon Friday
BRITTANY SPRIGGS

39

39

A Love Song
KEITH SHAW

40

40

This I Promise You
KEYTH YOUNGSTER

THE HOTDISC BRITISH & IRISH INDEPENDENT TOP 10

01

01

Travellin’ Soldier
MEGAN ADAMS

02

02

Pride
IAN HIGHLAND feat. FRANK JENNINGS

03

03

Raise That Bar
TONY CLARKE

04

04

Two Cats
OWEN MOORE

05

05

Highway Number Nine
DAVE SHERIFF

06

06

A Love Song
KEITH SHAW

07

07

Mexican Joe
MEXICAN JOE WALKER

08

09

I’m Texas Bound!
ROB ALLEN

09

08

I Am What I Am
TONY CLARKE

10

10

Travelling Star
MIM GREY

 

The Hotdisc chart is compiled from DJs and industry professionals’ ratings of songs currently being promoted on the Rush Released CD. They are not airplay charts, as airplay charts cannot work in Europe because there are no terrestrial country stations. The hundreds of country programmes on air which we service are likely to play a particular song only twice at most in a three month period, therefore rendering airplay charts insignificant in Europe. It works well in America where there are plenty of non-stop country stations but it does not work here. Any Airplay Chart you may see claiming to provide this service is bogus and Hotdisc does not condone these charts at all. They are misleading at best for the reasons stated.

The Hotdisc charts are put together weekly using ratings supplied by DJs who give scores to every song on the last three months’ editions of Rush Released. The scores are averaged out per week to give an accurate guide to the songs which are being championed by the industry. The aim is to showcase the songs which the industry professionals are flagging up as quality songs. This is a very useful exercise as it is free of politics, hype and rigging and done solely on merit!

Copyright © 2014, Hotdisc, The Old Manse, Hallidays Park, Selkirk, TD7 4LA, Scotland. Used with permission from HotDisk.

HotDisc Top 40 at Music Charts Magazine

 

The Boswell Legacy: The Story of the Boswell Sisters of New Orleans and the New Music They Gave to the WorldDate = 29 November 2014      

Authors = Kyla Titus and Chica Boswell Minnerly=The Boswell Legacy: The Story of the Boswell Sisters of New Orleans and the New Music They Gave to the World

Publisher = Vet Boswell Family Collection

 

Review =            

             In the opinion of Will Friedwald, the Boswell Sisters–Martha (1905-1958), Connie (1907-1976), and Helvetia (Vet) (1911-1988)–are “the greatest of all jazz vocal groups” (Jazz Singing: America’s Great Voices from Bessie Smith to Bebop and Beyond [New York: Scribner’s, 1990], 156). Though designating anything that lacks an objective standard of measure as “the greatest” mainly indicates personal preference, Friedwald, who is as knowledgeable about jazz singers as anyone, gives good reasons for his opinion. He is not alone in valuing the sisters’ music. According to the Encyclopædia Britannica, the trio ranks with Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross (established in 1957) as “the two greatest jazz vocal groups of all time” (http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/764573/the-Boswell-Sisters; accessed 30 November 2014). In other words, the Boswells are highly regarded by the cognoscenti. They are also largely unknown by more general music lovers, despite efforts by the Pfister Sisters (who are not siblings) and a few other groups to perpetuate their kind of music, as well as the holding of the Boswell Sisters Centennial Celebration in their hometown of New Orleans in 2007 (when Connie would have turned one hundred) and a weekend celebration sponsored by the Historic New Orleans Collection in October 2014. The second of these tributes was organized by Kyla Titus.

            In order to draw attention to the sisters, Titus wrote The Boswell Legacy. Its title page identifies the authors as Titus and Chica Boswell Minnerly. Titus graciously acknowledges Minnerly, her mother and the daughter of Vet Boswell, because in 1989 Minnerly and David W. McCain started writing a text that, after they abandoned it, ultimately evolved into The Boswell Legacy, thanks to Titus’s efforts. McCain wrote the introduction to the book. Minnerly also maintained a Boswell archive, the source of much if not most of the information Titus presents.

            Titus’s seemingly authoritative account of the sisters’ lives and careers may be summarized as follows. Because the siblings grew up in the same household and lived and traveled together even when they were most popular, their biographies are similar until the mid 1930s, when the Boswell Sisters disbanded. Musically precocious (as was their brother Clydie, born in 1900, who died of influenza during the 1918 pandemic), they had private music lessons (classical) and, by the late 1910s, performed locally as instrumentalists. Martha played piano; Connie, saxophone and cello; Vet, banjo, guitar, and violin. They discovered syncopation and soon used it in their playing. They might have been susceptible to it because their father, A. C., a former showman, was familiar with black music and could play ragtime piano. Jazz cornetist Emmett Hardy became their friend and inspired them. They attended numerous musical performances, including at the Lyric Theatre, which featured such black singers as Bessie Smith and Mamie Smith, who became major influences, especially on Connie. By the mid 1920s, they added singing to their act; reaction to it caused them to forsake their instruments and become a vocal group, though Martha served as accompanist. They recorded for the initial time when they were nineteen, seventeen, and thirteen, respectively. The Boswell Sisters’s existence was threatened when Martha married in 1925 and gave birth to a son the next year; the crisis was averted when Martha continued practicing with her siblings, she soon divorced her husband, and family members tended to the child. The group toured on the vaudeville circuit, appeared in movies, performed regularly on radio, and recorded frequently. Problems arose in 1930 when Harry Leedy, who was enamored of Connie, succeeded Martha as the sisters’ manager and began promoting Connie more than the Boswell Sisters. Nonetheless, he managed the siblings during their most productive and rewarding years. Their fame was such that they had an audience with President Hoover, twice toured Europe, and made more movies. They broke up soon after a recording session in early 1936. This happened primarily because Connie wanted a solo career (which proved successful), though she attributed the demise to her sisters’ domestic realities. By then, all three women were married: the families lived in Toronto (Martha), rural New York (Vet), and New York City (Connie, who married Leedy). Titus concludes her book by briefly summarizing the siblings’ post-group lives.

            Titus clarifies two matters relating to Connie that have not been fully understood: the cause(s) of her paralysis and why the spelling of her given name changed. At age three, she was injured in a wagon accident and later had polio; as a result of these events, but apparently mostly because of the second, her legs were paralyzed, though she lost all ability to walk only after falling from a window at age twenty-two. This infirmity explains why she performed seated. It also accounts for her developing considerable upper-body strength, as may be observed in a photograph of her, around age eight, hanging by one hand from a ledge of the family’s house. (The text is enhanced by many photographs.) Connie quit dotting the “i” in her name in order to save time when signing autographs circa 1942; the spelling therefore appeared to be Connee, by which she became known. The modification was, in a sense, accidental.

            Despite the thoroughness of her book, Titus introduces some topics for which she provides insufficient information. For example, she demonstrates that for a long time Connie and Leedy had strong feelings for each other. Because Connie lived with her sisters during this period yet was in frequent professional contact with Leedy, one would like to know the nature of the couple’s personal relationship and how it worked logistically, since she could move about by herself only in a wheelchair. Perhaps Titus does not address the romance because it is not documented. If so, her refusal to speculate is admirable. When writing about a 1955 photograph of the siblings, the author states that by then the lives of Martha and Vet were “isolated and lonely” (8), but does not substantiate the claim, especially about Vet. Further, she mentions “a bitter legal fight over [Martha’s] estate” (180) without providing particulars, such as the issues or parties involved in it.

            Though Titus’s prose is adequate, she uses words that do not allow for exception when there are exceptions, as in the constructions “the two sisters went everywhere together” (18) and “she and her mother were constantly at odds” (36). She suffers a lapse such as this: “Jimmy Fazio . . . knew whom they were” (9). She uses clichés, including “the families heard the call of the west” (14) and “his worldly charm” (15). A copy editor would have caught the infelicities, but Titus, who probably paid for the publication of the book, cannot be blamed for not having one: copy editors are expensive. These and other prose shortcomings do not lessen the value of The Boswell Legacy.

            Immediately before the epilogue, Titus refers to the gloriousness of the siblings’ creations and asks readers to “listen to the music and see if [they] do not agree” with her assessment of it (186). This is good advice because Titus discusses the music so little that one cannot conclude much about it from her text and therefore cannot comprehend why it was so popular. In only a few instances does she characterize the group’s sound: “in the trio’s arrangements, the sisters always made space for the musicians to play solo spots, with room to do their own thing without interference. They were masters of improvisation—the cornerstone of jazz” (112); “they received hundreds of requests for their arrangements, which, aside from their exceptional timing and voice blend, were central to the ‘Boswell Sound’” (117); and “they were close harmony singers and needed to keep the sound soft and intimate” (120), which is why they used a microphone during live performances. (“Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea,” “Got the South in My Soul,” and other tunes disprove the author’s statement that all the siblings’ recordings feature instrumental solos.) She notes that the sisters created their arrangements by working backward from the end of a chorus. Observations about their music in quotations from two published sources are more substantial than Titus’s own: in a 1937 number of Billboard, a writer claims that the siblings introduced variations on the first chorus in the second one, a technique many popular singers soon adopted; in an article published in 2008, James Von Schilling focuses on the sisters’ performance of “Crazy People” in the 1932 movie The Big Broadcast, though his commentary is descriptive, not analytical. While the book’s subtitle indicates that Titus will tell “the story of . . . the new music [the siblings] gave to the world,” she does not do so effectively. A few substantial paragraphs or a brief chapter about the quality of the sisters’ music would have been helpful in this regard.

            Though Titus specifies improvisation (by the likes of Bunny Berigan, the Dorsey brothers, Benny Goodman, Manny Klein, and Joe Venuti) and close harmony (probably absorbed while growing up in a family that featured barbershop quartet singing by the parents and an aunt and uncle) as hallmarks of the sisters’ music, she overlooks the Boswells’ energy, which helped elevate their creations above the mostly staid popular music of the time. (Among contemporaneous vocal groups, probably only the Mills Brothers came close to the siblings’ inventiveness and musical accomplishment.) Further, the sisters’ music is distinguished by an appealing irregularity of tempos, keys, and accents.

            Fortunately, readers interested in the Boswells’ music can easily honor Titus’s request to listen to it by accessing it—and viewing some of the trio’s movie appearances–at youtube.com. There, one special treat is a scratchy recording of “I’m Gonna Cry,” from the sisters’ initial recording session (1925). It is a feature for Connie, whose singing seems derived from blues singers she heard as a youth. She had a large, powerful voice—though less so than Bessie Smith’s, for example–which is evident here as she belts out the song. During a chorus, she sings in the manner of an instrument, with Vet providing harmony. Someone listening to this performance unaware might well think Connie black and confuse her with one of the classic blues singers. One would likely be surprised to learn that at the time of this recording, she was only seventeen.

            Though in time the sisters’ singing became less coarse than on “I’m Gonna Cry,” it remained adventuresome and dynamic. Partly because of Connie’s retention of a blues feeling as well as her spontaneity and use of jazz phrasing, the group not only became popular, but influential. The siblings directly inspired the slicker and less improvisational Andrews Sisters, who became possibly even more popular than the Boswells had been. Perhaps most importantly, Ella Fitzgerald admitted to only one musical influence, Connie, who, according to Norman David, “fused the blues nuances of Bessie Smith’s singing and the jazz vocabulary of the genius [Louis] Armstrong to create her own unique style.” He also believes that Fitzgerald learned, from Connie, how to meld “the jazz idiom with popular music” (The Ella Fitzgerald Companion [Westport, CT: Praeger, 2004], 40). That is, Connie’s singing with her sisters was the greatest influence on the single most accomplished female jazz and pop singer. Inexplicably, Titus omits Fitzgerald from her text, though she mentions her on the back cover, where she states, without comment, that Fitzgerald “consistently credited Connie Boswell as her main influence.”        

            In sum, Titus has written a valuable book. Because it is based on archival research, it is the most reliable source of information about the sisters’ lives and careers. Though the author largely ignores the nature of the siblings’ music, readers can enjoy and evaluate it by accessing it on-line. Reading her study in conjunction with listening to the music will lead to an understanding of the sisters’ innovations and of why the group was so popular and influential. The recordings of the Boswell Sisters are of lasting value, as is The Boswell Legacy.  

 

Author = Benjamin Franklin V

 

About Fred’s Country program:

Le program Fred’s Country: La musique Country de Tradition avec Frederic (Fred) Moreau. Le program Fred’s Country est diffusé sur 65 fréquences FM, 53 radios ou webradios.

The Fred’s Country program, is hosted by Frederic (Fred) Moreau and broadcasted weekly on 47 frequencies, 53 Affiliated FM and Web Radio Stations in France, Canada, Belgium, Spain, and more. Listen, download The Fred’s Country program here…

Autre particularité du program Fred’s Country, c’est la seule émission en Europe à programmer un minimum de 75% d’artistes Canadiens particularity of the Fred’s Country program, each week, a minimum of 75% of Canadian Country artists on the air

Radio Show Host: Fred Moreau

Program Fred’s Country w48-2014 – 28 Novembre 2014 à 15:00 – November 28th, 2014

 

 

Music Charts Magazine is proud to be friends with Mr. Moreau and glad to now be one of the many to host Program Fred’s Country. ( French/English)

Radio Program “Fred’s Country” – Now at Music Charts Magazine!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 November 24, 2014

 

Album

LW

TW

Artist

Title

(Label)

TW SPINS

LW SPINS

Weeks on Chart

Spin +/-

Stations

3

1

Stoney LaRue

Golden Shackles

(eOne Music)

1,441

1,448

14

-7

77

2

2

Pat Green w/Lyle Lovett

Girls From Texas

(Sugar Hill Records)

1,437

1,476

12

-39

74

4

3

Josh Abbott Band

Hangin’ Around

(Warner/Atlantic)

1,356

1,326

11

+30

73

1

4

Wade Bowen

When I Woke Up Today

(Lightning Rod Records)

1,353

1,528

12

-175

74

5

5

Kyle Park

Turn That Crown Upside Down

(Indie/Thirty Tigers)

1,262

1,237

10

+25

72

6

6

Aaron Watson

That Look

(BIG Label/Thirty Tigers)

1,192

1,124

6

+68

72

9

7

Sam Riggs

Hold On and Let Go

(SR)

1,125

1,024

16

+101

67

11

8

Randy Rogers Band

She’s Gonna Run

(MCA Nashville)

1,077

977

10

+100

72

8

9

John Slaughter

Horseshoes & Hand Grenades

(JS)

1,036

1,054

17

-18

66

12

10

Jon Wolfe

What Are You Doin’ Right Now

(JW)

927

924

14

+3

57

13

11

Curtis Grimes

Baby Don’t Cry

(CG)

923

901

9

+22

62

7

12

Brian Keane

You Can’t Go Home

(BK)

915

1,056

18

-141

57

14

13

Mark McKinney

Maybe We Should

(Texas Evolution)

910

885

15

+25

61

16

14

William Clark Green

Sympathy

(Bill Grease Records)

865

790

6

+75

64

15

15

Reckless Kelly

The Girl I Knew

(No Big Deal)

855

822

7

+33

64

18

16

Roger Creager

Road Show

(Roger Creager Music)

781

743

6

+38

59

10

17

Sunny Sweeney

Bad Girl Phase

(Thirty Tigers)

734

984

19

-250

50

22

18

Zane Williams

Texas Like That

(ZW)

721

683

5

+38

56

20

19

Whiskey Myers

Early Morning Shakes

(Wiggy Thump)

703

700

6

+3

52

24

20

Cody Canada and the Departed

Inbetweener

(Underground Sound)

695

638

5

+57

51

19

21

Sean McConnell

Bottom Of The Sea

(SM)

688

715

14

-27

51

23

22

Gabe Garcia

Missing

(396 Entertainment)

649

662

11

-13

42

21

23

Brandon Rhyder

That’s Just Me

(Reserve Records)

641

687

8

-46

56

26

24

TJ Broscoff

My Dear

(BGM Records)

630

608

7

+22

47

25

25

Green River Ordinance

She Is In The Air

(GRO)

607

613

8

-6

47

17

26

Kevin Fowler

Panhandle Poorboy

(Kevin Fowler Records)

598

782

20

-184

45

PHOTO COMING SOON

28

27

Will Hoge

Middle of America

(WH)

568

550

3

+18

49

40

28

The Rusty Brothers

The Devil (Revisited)

(Vision Ent.)

554

432

13

+122

30

30

29

Jason Eady

Lonesome Down and Out

(JE)

550

537

10

+13

47

38

30

Thom Shepherd

Beer Pong Anthem

(Twang Thang)

515

437

3

+78

40

31

31

Prophets And Outlaws

Shine On Me

(Seven Set Jam Records)

510

522

5

-12

34

33

32

Jason Cassidy

Take It Off

(JC)

489

501

10

-12

45

29

33

Micky & the Motorcars

Hearts From Above

(Smith Ent.)

478

540

20

-62

44

27

34

Shane Smith & The Saints

Dance the Night Away

(SSS)

466

553

18

-87

36

37

35

Clay Thrash

Ain’t No Law

(Grange Records)

462

449

9

+13

35

35

36

Aaron Einhouse

Blue Collar Troubadour

(AE)

461

461

10

—–

30

39

37

Adam Fears

There’s A Girl Out There

(LandStar Entertainment)

449

435

6

+14

43

36

38

Kris Gordon

Worth a Shot

(Frio Records)

439

456

12

-17

35

42

39

Jeremy Steding

My Own American Dream

(JS)

438

408

4

+30

41

34

40

Mike Ryan

Dancing All Around It

(MR)

414

475

25

-61

31

44

41

Matt Caldwell

I’d Like To Know

(AMP)

413

394

4

+19

35

43

42

Matt Kimbrow

Lovin’ So Blind

(MK)

405

396

5

+9

37

N

43

Granger Smith

Bury Me in Blue Jeans

(Independent/Thirty Tigers)

401

272

1

+129

45

N

44

Kimberly Dunn

Trashy Side

(KD)

381

304

1

+77

36

50

45

Paul Thorn

Everything’s Gonna Be Alright

(Perpetual Obscurity Records)

379

311

2

+68

28

46

46

Jake Ward w/Melissa Brooke

Hit The Road

(JW)

365

392

8

-27

39

47

47

Abbi Walker

Southern Soul

(AW)

362

367

3

-5

32

48

48

Clayton Gardner

Don’t Miss It

(CG)

357

362

2

-5

34

41

49

Mario Flores

High on Summertime

(MF)

301

416

11

-115

21

N

50

Zach Coffey

Comin’ Back Around

(ZC)

291

275

1

+16

32

 

Non Reports:
1st Week: KYBI, KYKS
2nd Week: KBST
Freezes: KKCN, KMOO, KMOU, KOKE, KOXE, KSAM, KSTV, KVST, KWEY, KXAX 

Copyright © 2014, the Texas Music Chart. Used with permission from Best In Texas Music Marketing LLC, Houston, TX

.

HOTDISC TOP 40
 
  23 November 2014

 

This is a list of the Top 40 Most Popular Songs released on the Rush Released promotional CD. Each week DJs and media people who receive Rush Released send back their reaction sheets where they are given the chance to rate every song. This chart is exclusively for clients of the Rush Released CD.  The chart is published weekly here, and also in Country Music People, Country Music & Dance, Up Country and Southern Country magazines.

To watch the video for each song (where available) click on the titles.

01

03

Drunk Americans
TOBY KEITH

02 02

That’ll Be The Day
MERLE HAGGARD

03 01

An Affair To Remember
RAY PRICE feat. MARTINA McBRIDE

04 05

TRAVELLIN’ SOLDIER
MEGAN ADAMS

05 06

Enjoy The Ride
BRIAN COLLINS

06

07

New Country Singers
JAMES CAROTHERS

07

08

Feels Like Coming Home
DAVID STARR  

08 04

Pride
IAN HIGHLAND feat. FRANK JENNINGS

09

11

Mosaic
BEAU + LUCI

10 13

He’s Messed Up!!!  
JO DEE MESSINA

 

 

 

 

11 14

Miranda In The Moonlight
GORDON JENSEN

12

12

My Best Friend
MICHAEL LUSK

13

15

Raise That Bar
TONY CLARKE

14

09

Good On You
NATIVE RUN 

15

10

Drinkin’ Beer
RAY SCOTT 

16

18

Like A Fading Rose
KARIN WRIGHT

17

20

Stay 
MADELINE SMITH 

18

22

Two Cats
OWEN MOORE

19

23

Memphis Buzz
DAVID HILGENFELDT PROJECT 

20

16

I’m Gonna Hire A Wino (To Decorate Our Home)
DAVID FRIZZELL

 

 

 

 

21

17

Gaia Blues
KENNY BUTTERILL feat. DONOVAN LEITCH 

22

19

One Night Between Friends
KATIE ARMIGER

23

21

Radio Song
MICHAEL SCOTT

24

29

Down To Ride
MIKE DONNELL BAND

25 24

Fire
BEAU + LUCI

26 30

Applications For An Angel
C W MONTGOMERY

27 25

Highway Number Nine
DAVE SHERIFF  

28

31

Hometown Hottie  
LOCATION OF INCIDENT

29

35

Hit The Ground Runnin’
CRAB APPLE LANE

30

34

Unfaithfully  
A P MAURO 

 

 

 

 

31

32

Ralph The Sneaky Elf
DAVID WOOD

32

37

With Your Hands
CAMERON-TROY

33

26

Fishin’ Pole Dancin’
BRUCE LARSON

34

27

Hop In My Truck
TIM CADIERE  

35

28

California Girls Have Gone Country
STEVIE LEE WOODS

36

33

Southern Drawl
DAVID SHELBY

37

36

Party In The Barn
JAMES ROBERT WEBB

38

38

Full Moon Friday
BRITTANY SPRIGGS

39

RE

A Love Song
KEITH SHAW

40

39

This I Promise You
KEYTH YOUNGSTER

THE HOTDISC BRITISH & IRISH INDEPENDENT TOP 10

01

02

Travellin’ Soldier
MEGAN ADAMS

02

01

Pride
IAN HIGHLAND feat. FRANK JENNINGS

03

03

Raise That Bar
TONY CLARKE

04

04

Two Cats
OWEN MOORE

05

05

Highway Number Nine
DAVE SHERIFF

06

07

A Love Song
KEITH SHAW

07

06

Mexican Joe
MEXICAN JOE WALKER

08

08

I Am What I Am
TONY CLARKE

09

10

I’m Texas Bound!
ROB ALLEN

10

09

Travelling Star
MIM GREY

 

The Hotdisc chart is compiled from DJs and industry professionals’ ratings of songs currently being promoted on the Rush Released CD. They are not airplay charts, as airplay charts cannot work in Europe because there are no terrestrial country stations. The hundreds of country programmes on air which we service are likely to play a particular song only twice at most in a three month period, therefore rendering airplay charts insignificant in Europe. It works well in America where there are plenty of non-stop country stations but it does not work here. Any Airplay Chart you may see claiming to provide this service is bogus and Hotdisc does not condone these charts at all. They are misleading at best for the reasons stated.

The Hotdisc charts are put together weekly using ratings supplied by DJs who give scores to every song on the last three months’ editions of Rush Released. The scores are averaged out per week to give an accurate guide to the songs which are being championed by the industry. The aim is to showcase the songs which the industry professionals are flagging up as quality songs. This is a very useful exercise as it is free of politics, hype and rigging and done solely on merit!

Copyright © 2014, Hotdisc, The Old Manse, Hallidays Park, Selkirk, TD7 4LA, Scotland. Used with permission from HotDisk.

HotDisc Top 40 at Music Charts Magazine

About Fred’s Country program:

Le program Fred’s Country: La musique Country de Tradition avec Frederic (Fred) Moreau. Le program Fred’s Country est diffusé sur 65 fréquences FM, 53 radios ou webradios.

The Fred’s Country program, is hosted by Frederic (Fred) Moreau and broadcasted weekly on 47 frequencies, 53 Affiliated FM and Web Radio Stations in France, Canada, Belgium, Spain, and more. Listen, download The Fred’s Country program here…

Autre particularité du program Fred’s Country, c’est la seule émission en Europe à programmer un minimum de 75% d’artistes Canadiens particularity of the Fred’s Country program, each week, a minimum of 75% of Canadian Country artists on the air

Radio Show Host: Fred Moreau

Program Fred’s Country w47-2014 – 21 Novembre 2014 à 15:00 – November 21st, 2014

 

 

Music Charts Magazine is proud to be friends with Mr. Moreau and glad to now be one of the many to host Program Fred’s Country. ( French/English)

Radio Program “Fred’s Country” – Now at Music Charts Magazine!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

November 17, 2014

 

Album

LW

TW

Artist

Title

(Label)

TW SPINS

LW SPINS

Weeks on Chart

Spin +/-

Stations

1

1

Wade Bowen

When I Woke Up Today

(Lightning Rod Records)

1,528

1,454

11

+74

79

2

2

Pat Green w/Lyle Lovett

Girls From Texas

(Sugar Hill Records)

1,476

1,379

11

+97

76

3

3

Stoney LaRue

Golden Shackles

(eOne Music)

1,448

1,358

13

+90

78

5

4

Josh Abbott Band

Hangin’ Around

(Warner/Atlantic)

1,326

1,192

10

+134

73

6

5

Kyle Park

Turn That Crown Upside Down

(Indie/Thirty Tigers)

1,237

1,143

9

+94

74

10

6

Aaron Watson

That Look

(BIG Label/Thirty Tigers)

1,124

936

5

+188

72

7

7

Brian Keane

You Can’t Go Home

(BK)

1,056

1,110

17

-54

64

9

8

John Slaughter

Horseshoes & Hand Grenades

(JS)

1,054

962

16

+92

67

8

9

Sam Riggs

Hold On and Let Go

(SR)

1,024

967

15

+57

65

4

10

Sunny Sweeney

Bad Girl Phase

(Thirty Tigers)

984

1,231

18

-247

60

11

11

Randy Rogers Band

She’s Gonna Run

(MCA Nashville)

977

934

9

+43

68

12

12

Jon Wolfe

What Are You Doin’ Right Now

(JW)

924

910

13

+14

57

15

13

Curtis Grimes

Baby Don’t Cry

(CG)

901

772

8

+129

61

14

14

Mark McKinney

Maybe We Should

(Texas Evolution)

885

774

14

+111

60

19

15

Reckless Kelly

The Girl I Knew

(No Big Deal)

822

648

6

+174

64

17

16

William Clark Green

Sympathy

(Bill Grease Records)

790

707

5

+83

60

13

17

Kevin Fowler

Panhandle Poorboy

(Kevin Fowler Records)

782

852

19

-70

51

20

18

Roger Creager

Road Show

(Roger Creager Music)

743

641

5

+102

56

21

19

Sean McConnell

Bottom Of The Sea

(SM)

715

639

13

+76

52

18

20

Whiskey Myers

Early Morning Shakes

(Wiggy Thump)

700

661

5

+39

54

23

21

Brandon Rhyder

That’s Just Me

(Reserve Records)

687

622

7

+65

58

24

22

Zane Williams

Texas Like That

(ZW)

683

616

4

+67

55

25

23

Gabe Garcia

Missing

(396 Entertainment)

662

611

10

+51

42

28

24

Cody Canada and the Departed

Inbetweener

(Underground Sound)

638

566

4

+72

48

29

25

Green River Ordinance

She Is In The Air

(GRO)

613

553

7

+60

49

26

26

TJ Broscoff

My Dear

(BGM Records)

608

574

6

+34

46

22

27

Shane Smith & The Saints

Dance the Night Away

(SSS)

553

625

17

-72

40

PHOTO COMING SOON

39

28

Will Hoge

Middle of America

(WH)

550

434

2

+116

48

27

29

Micky & the Motorcars

Hearts From Above

(Smith Ent.)

540

568

19

-28

45

32

30

Jason Eady

Lonesome Down and Out

(JE)

537

530

9

+7

45

34

31

Prophets And Outlaws

Shine On Me

(Seven Set Jam Records)

522

488

4

+34

38

16

32

Cameran Nelson

Shotgun

(CN)

505

736

19

-231

40

36

33

Jason Cassidy

Take It Off

(JC)

501

462

9

+39

47

31

34

Mike Ryan

Dancing All Around It

(MR)

475

550

24

-75

39

42

35

Aaron Einhouse

Blue Collar Troubadour

(AE)

461

409

9

+52

30

38

36

Kris Gordon

Worth a Shot

(Frio Records)

456

443

11

+13

37

40

37

Clay Thrash

Ain’t No Law

(Grange Records)

449

434

8

+15

35

45

38

Thom Shepherd

Beer Pong Anthem

(Twang Thang)

437

383

2

+54

37

43

39

Adam Fears

There’s A Girl Out There

(LandStar Entertainment)

435

405

5

+30

41

48

40

The Rusty Brothers

The Devil (Revisited)

(Vision Ent.)

432

368

12

+64

31

30

41

Mario Flores

High on Summertime

(MF)

416

552

10

-136

33

49

42

Jeremy Steding

My Own American Dream

(JS)

408

366

3

+42

41

47

43

Matt Kimbrow

Lovin’ So Blind

(MK)

396

374

4

+22

35

46

44

Matt Caldwell

I’d Like To Know

(AMP)

394

376

3

+18

32

35

45

Dolly Shine

Her Name Was Trouble

(DS)

394

487

15

-93

27

44

46

Jake Ward w/Melissa Brooke

Hit The Road

(JW)

392

398

7

-6

39

50

47

Abbi Walker

Southern Soul

(AW)

367

333

2

+34

32

PHOTO COMING SOON

N

48

Clayton Gardner

Don’t Miss It

(CG)

362

261

1

+101

34

37

49

JB and the Moonshine Band

Yes

(Average Joe’s)

319

449

17

-130

30

PHOTO COMING SOON

N

50

Paul Thorn

Everything’s Gonna Be Alright

(Perpetual Obscurity Records)

311

201

1

+110

23

 

Non Reports:

1st Week:  KBST, KXIT, TXRDR

 

Freezes:  KACO, KFWR, KMOU, KRVA, KSEL, KTKO

Copyright © 2014, the Texas Music Chart. Used with permission from Best In Texas Music Marketing LLC, Houston, TX

.

HOTDISC TOP 40
16 November 2014

 

This is a list of the Top 40 Most Popular Songs released on the Rush Released promotional CD. Each week DJs and media people who receive Rush Released send back their reaction sheets where they are given the chance to rate every song. This chart is exclusively for clients of the Rush Released CD.  The chart is published weekly here, and also in Country Music People, Country Music & Dance, Up Country and Southern Country magazines.

To watch the video for each song (where available) click on the titles.

01 01

An Affair To Remember
RAY PRICE feat. MARTINA McBRIDE

02 03

That’ll Be The Day
MERLE HAGGARD

03

07

Drunk Americans
TOBY KEITH

04 02

Pride
IAN HIGHLAND feat. FRANK JENNINGS

05 08

TRAVELLIN’ SOLDIER
MEGAN ADAMS

06 06

Enjoy The Ride
BRIAN COLLINS

07

09

New Country Singers
JAMES CAROTHERS

08

13

Feels Like Coming Home
DAVID STARR  

09

04

Good On You
NATIVE RUN 

10

05

Drinkin’ Beer
RAY SCOTT 

 

 

 

 

11

16

Mosaic
BEAU + LUCI

12

14

My Best Friend
MICHAEL LUSK

13 18

He’s Messed Up!!!  
JO DEE MESSINA

14 20

Miranda In The Moonlight
GORDON JENSEN

15

19

Raise That Bar
TONY CLARKE

16

10

I’m Gonna Hire A Wino (To Decorate Our Home)
DAVID FRIZZELL

17

11

Gaia Blues
KENNY BUTTERILL feat. DONOVAN LEITCH 

18

24

Like A Fading Rose
KARIN WRIGHT

19

12

One Night Between Friends
KATIE ARMIGER

20

25

Stay 
MADELINE SMITH 

 

 

 

 

21

15

Radio Song
MICHAEL SCOTT

22

26

Two Cats
OWEN MOORE

23

30

Memphis Buzz
DAVID HILGENFELDT PROJECT 

24 17

Fire
BEAU + LUCI

25 21

Highway Number Nine
DAVE SHERIFF  

26

22

Fishin’ Pole Dancin’
BRUCE LARSON

27

27

Hop In My Truck
TIM CADIERE  

28

23

California Girls Have Gone Country
STEVIE LEE WOODS

29

29

Down To Ride
MIKE DONNELL BAND

30 32

Applications For An Angel
C W MONTGOMERY

 

 

 

 

31

36

Hometown Hottie  
LOCATION OF INCIDENT

32

34

Ralph The Sneaky Elf
DAVID WOOD

33

31

Southern Drawl
DAVID SHELBY

34

38

Unfaithfully  
A P MAURO 

35

NE

Hit The Ground Runnin’
CRAB APPLE LANE

36

28

Party In The Barn
JAMES ROBERT WEBB

37

NE

With Your Hands
CAMERON-TROY

38

37

Full Moon Friday
BRITTANY SPRIGGS

39

35

This I Promise You
KEYTH YOUNGSTER

40

40

Whole Lot Of Livin’
NORTH 40

THE HOTDISC BRITISH & IRISH INDEPENDENT TOP 10

01

01

Pride
IAN HIGHLAND feat. FRANK JENNINGS

02

02

Travellin’ Soldier
MEGAN ADAMS

03

03

Raise That Bar
TONY CLARKE

04

05

Two Cats
OWEN MOORE

05

04

Highway Number Nine
DAVE SHERIFF

06

07

Mexican Joe
MEXICAN JOE WALKER

07

09

A Love Song
KEITH SHAW

08

06

I Am What I Am
TONY CLARKE

09

08

Travelling Star
MIM GREY

10

10

I’m Texas Bound!
ROB ALLEN

 

The Hotdisc chart is compiled from DJs and industry professionals’ ratings of songs currently being promoted on the Rush Released CD. They are not airplay charts, as airplay charts cannot work in Europe because there are no terrestrial country stations. The hundreds of country programmes on air which we service are likely to play a particular song only twice at most in a three month period, therefore rendering airplay charts insignificant in Europe. It works well in America where there are plenty of non-stop country stations but it does not work here. Any Airplay Chart you may see claiming to provide this service is bogus and Hotdisc does not condone these charts at all. They are misleading at best for the reasons stated.

The Hotdisc charts are put together weekly using ratings supplied by DJs who give scores to every song on the last three months’ editions of Rush Released. The scores are averaged out per week to give an accurate guide to the songs which are being championed by the industry. The aim is to showcase the songs which the industry professionals are flagging up as quality songs. This is a very useful exercise as it is free of politics, hype and rigging and done solely on merit!

Copyright © 2014, Hotdisc, The Old Manse, Hallidays Park, Selkirk, TD7 4LA, Scotland. Used with permission from HotDisk.

HotDisc Top 40 at Music Charts Magazine

Link to Music Charts Magazine ®:

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